Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Speaker: Liang Luo
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-13 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-13 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-4-13 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Paul Robeson was a renowned American concert artist and stage and film actor who sang what became the Chinese national anthem, “March of the Volunteers,” in Mandarin Chinese in New York City and Prague, among other locations, from the late 1930s onward. Joris Ivens was a Dutch documentary filmmaker who traveled to China in 1938 to film The 400 Million (1939), a documentary that depicted the Chinese resistance against Japanese invasion and publicized “March of the Volunteers” as one of its key soundtracks. This talk connects Paul Robeson and Joris Ivens through their activist roles in the making of the Chinese national anthem, in the context of their generation of the international avant-garde, and in relation to their complex and evolving relationship with modern Chinese cultural politics, from the late 1930s to the late 1950s.

Born in Chongqing, China, Professor Liang Luo received her B.A. in Chinese and M.A. in Comparative Literature from Beijing Normal University, and her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University. She is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Kentucky and the author of The Avant-Garde and the Popular in Modern China (Michigan, 2014) and The Global White Snake (Michigan, 2021). Her current book and documentary film project is titled Profound Propaganda: The International Avant-garde and Modern China.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Speaker: William A. Callahan
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-8 | 11:15-12:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-7 | 22:15-00:30 (New York)
2021-4-8 | 7:15-8:30 (Abu Dhabi)

China: The Pessoptimist Nation considers how we need to look beyond the PRC’s growing economic and military power to consider how history, culture, and identity frame China’s domestic politics and international affairs. While mainstream international relations scholars talk of a security dilemma – where one state’s military strength provokes other states’ military development in a vicious cycle – the presentation suggests that Chinese politics is shaped by an “identity dilemma”: an interplay of positive and negative feelings that shape China’s pessoptimist view of itself and the world. Rather than answering the standard social science question “what is China?” with statistics of economic and military power, the presentation asks “when, where and who is China?” to explore how China’s national security is closely linked to its nationalist insecurities. While it is common to look to history to answer political questions (e.g. the “history war” between China and Japan), this presentation argues that we need to look to politics to understand history: i.e. as textbooks and popular histories from Taiwan show, the “Century of National Humiliation” is not the only way to talk about China’s modern history and politics. The presentation considers how Xi Jinping’s discussions of the China Dream and National Rejuvenation emerge from national humiliation discourse, and what this means for China (and the world) in the 2020s.  

William A. Callahan is professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and in 2020-21 he is Taiwan Foundation for Democracy Fellow at National Taiwan University. His research examines the interplay of culture and politics, and visual global politics. Callahan’s most recent book is Sensible Politics: Visualizing International Relations (Oxford University Press, 2020). His other work includes China: The Pessoptimist Nation (OUP, 2010) and the documentary film “Great Walls” (2020), which asks why we hate Trump’s wall and love the Great Wall of China (https://sensiblepolitics.net/great-walls-journeys-from-ideology-to-experience). 

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going? A Historian’s Perspective

Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going?
A Historian’s Perspective

Speaker: Edward A. Alpers
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-26 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-26 | 9:00-10:30 (New York)
2021-3-26 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-3-26 | 14:00-15:30 (Berlin)

Co-organizer: Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

This talk offers a survey of Indian Ocean Studies, focusing primarily on the development of its historiography after World War II and its emergence as a distinct scholarly enterprise from the 1980s to the present day. In particular, it examines some of the seminal monographs that have been published over the past two decades, suggesting the characteristics and challenges of modern historiography as reflected in these works. The talk concludes by raising a number of lingering questions and suggesting ways ahead for future scholarship.

Edward A. Alpers is Research Professor (Emeritus) in the UCLA Department of History. He studied African History at Harvard College and received his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Before joining UCLA in 1968 he taught for two years at the University of Dar es Salaam; in 1980 he taught at the Somali National University as a Fulbright Senior Scholar. In 1994 he served as President of the African Studies Association (USA) (1994). His research and writing focus on international trade in Indian Ocean Africa. His major publications include Ivory and Slaves in East Central Africa (1975), East Africa and the Indian Ocean (2009), and The Indian Ocean in World History (2014); he has also co-edited Cross-Currents and Community Networks: The History of the Indian Ocean World (2007), Connectivity in Motion: Island Hubs in the Indian Ocean World (2018), and Transregional Trade and Traders: Situating Gujarat in the Indian Ocean from early times to c.1900 (2019).

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Burkhard Schnepel, Professor of Social Anthropology Acting Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Area Studies Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg.

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Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Speaker: Gina Marchetti
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-16 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-16 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-3-16 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Throughout its history, Hong Kong has been a transit hub serving as a point of arrival and departure for people as well as goods from around the world. These global flows hold a particular significance for women as they face unique challenges related to intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality within the Chinese diaspora. Hong Kong’s women filmmakers tell a range of stories about migration focusing on female protagonists as they navigate the various transnational networks that connect Mainland China, Hong Kong, and the rest of the world. This presentation focuses on films made by Hong Kong’s New Wave women directors, including Ann Hui, Mabel Cheung, and Clara Law, as they portray female characters located in and moving through Hong Kong from the 1980s into the twenty-first century. These prominent women directors chart the impact of Hong Kong’s change in status from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People’s Republic of China on women by drawing on various genres including the youth drama, family melodrama, and the romantic comedy.

The presentation concludes with a look at more recent developments related to women and Hong Kong history by examining Bo Wang and (Iris) Pan Lu’s Many Undulating Things (2019) in relation to COVID-19. This essay film devotes a substantial section to Hong Kong’s history of disease with specific references to the territory’s women by citing the Hollywood film Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing (Henry King, 1955). Returning to Hong Kong’s colonial past via this cinematic relationship between disease and desire, women filmmakers’ perspectives on Hong Kong, diaspora, and gender take on new meaning in our pandemic present.

Gina Marchetti teaches courses in film, gender and sexuality, critical theory and cultural studies. Her books include “Yellow Peril”: Race, Sex and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction (Berkeley: University of California, 1993), From Tian’anmen to Times Square: Transnational China and the Chinese Diaspora on Global Screens (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006), Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s INFERNAL AFFAIRS—The Trilogy (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2007), The Chinese Diaspora on American Screens: Race, Sex, and Cinema (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012), and Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema (Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi, 2018)

She has co-edited several anthologies, including Hong Kong Film, Hollywood and the New Global Cinema, with Tan See-Kam (London: Routledge, 2007); Chinese Connections: Critical Perspectives on Film, Identity and Diaspora, with Peter X Feng and Tan See-Kam (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009); Hong Kong Screenscapes: From the New Wave to the Digital Frontier, with Esther M. K. Cheung and Tan See-Kam (HKUP, 2011); and The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema, with See Kam Tan and Aaron Magnan-Park (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

Her current research interests include women filmmakers in the HKSAR, China and world cinema, and contemporary trends in Asian and Asian American film culture.

Suggested readings:

Marchetti, Gina. “Clara Law, Asia, and World Cinema,” in Aaron Han Joon Magnan-Park, Gina Marchetti, and Tan See-Kam, eds. The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema (Palgrave-Macmillan Publishers, 2018), pp.689-707.

Marchetti, Gina. “Handover Women: Hong Kong Women Filmmakers and the Intergenerational Melodrama of Infidelity,” Feminist Media Studies 16:4 (June 2016), pp. 590-609. DOI:10.1080/14680777.2016.1193292. Special Issue: “Intergenerational Feminist Media Studies: Conflicts and Connectivities”

Marchetti, Gina. “Feminism, Postfeminism, and Hong Kong Women Filmmakers,” in Esther M.K. Cheung, Gina Marchetti, and Esther C.M. Yau, eds. A Companion to Hong Kong Cinema (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2015), pp. 237-264.

Marchetti, Gina. “The Gender of GenerAsian X in Clara Law’s Migration Trilogy,” Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls: Gender in Film at the End of the Twentieth Century, ed. Murray Pomerance (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), pp. 71-87.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Weixian Pan, Assistant Professor of Interactive Media Arts, Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU.

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• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Speaker: Emily Wilcox
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-2-23 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-2-23 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-2-23 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this talk Professor Emily Wilcox will discuss transnational connections in modern Chinese dance history based on her recent book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy. As the first English-language history of dance in the People’s Republic of China, Revolutionary Bodies examines previously unexamined dance films, a wide range of Chinese-language published and archival materials, and ethnographic field research to analyze the work of major Chinese choreographers from 1935 to 2015. With a focus on transnational connections in this history, Wilcox challenges the previously held view that Soviet ballet was the primary force shaping China’s socialist dance creation, instead showing the impact of a broader range of intercultural connections, from Trinidad and London to North Korea and Uzbekistan. Wilcox also shows the important role that ethnic minority and diaspora artists played in twentieth-century Chinese dance history and demonstrates continuities and changes from the early socialist period to new choreography that has emerged in the past two decades. A central argument of the book is that transnational socialist dance experiments laid the basis for the art form today known around the world as “Chinese Dance.”

Emily Wilcox is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at William & Mary and an Affiliate of the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan. Wilcox is a leading scholar of Chinese dance and performance, with broader interests in twentieth-century global history, transnationalism, and social movements. Wilcox’s first book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy (University of California Press in 2018) won the 2019 de la Torre Bueno Prize© from the Dance Studies Association. Wilcox is the co-editor with Katherine Mezur of Corporeal Politics: Dancing East Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2020) and co-creator with Liangyu Fu of the Pioneers of Chinese Dance digital photograph archive, published in 2016 by the University of Michigan Asia Library. Wilcox has published more than twenty journal articles and book chapters, in English and Chinese, in leading venues in Asian studies and dance and performance studies. Wilcox taught at the University of Michigan from 2013 to 2020, where she served most recently as Associate Professor, Associate Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.

Introduction and moderation by Siye Tao, Assistant Arts Professor of Dance, NYU Shanghai.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Sex Work, Media Networks, and Transpacific Histories of Affect

Sex Work, Media Networks, and Transpacific Histories of Affect

Speaker: Lily Wong
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-12-8 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2020-12-8 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2020-12-8 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

The figure of the sex worker—who provokes both disdain and desire—has become a trope for both Asian American sexuality and Asian modernity. Lingering in the cultural imagination, sex workers link sexual and cultural marginality, and their tales clarify the boundaries of citizenship, nationalism, and internationalism. Based on her book, Transpacific Attachments, Lily Wong will discuss the mobility and mobilization of the sex worker figure through transpacific media networks, stressing the intersectional politics of racial, sexual, and class structures. While imaginations of a global community have long been mobilized through romantic, erotic, and gendered representations, Wong emphasizes the significant role sex work plays in the constant restructuring of social relations and transpacific alliances.

Lily Wong is an Associate Professor in the departments of Literature (LIT) and Critical Race Gender and Culture Studies (CRGC) at American University. Her research focuses on the politics of affect/emotion, gender/sexuality, racial capitalism, minor-transnational solidarity movements, as well as media formations of transpacific Chinese, Sinophone, and Asian American communities. Her work can be found in journals including American Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Asian Cinema, Asian American Literary Review, Pacific Affairs, and China Review International, among others. She has published book chapters in World Cinema and the Visual Arts (2012), Queer Sinophone Cultures (2013), Divided Lenses: War and Film Memory in Asia (2016), and Keywords in Queer Sinophone Studies (2020). She is the author of the book Transpacific Attachments: Sex Work, Media Networks, and Affective Histories of Chineseness (Columbia University Press, 2018).

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Weixian Pan, Assistant Professor of Interactive Media Arts, Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU.

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• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Sinophone Queer Homecoming as Tactics of Interventions

Sinophone Queer Homecoming as Tactics of Interventions

Speaker: E. K. Tan
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-11-17 | 17:00-18:30 (Shanghai)
2020-11-17 | 4:00-5:30 (New York)
2020-11-17 | 13:00-14:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this presentation, I discuss the concept of “queer homecoming” as tactics of interventions that enables the articulation of alternative kinship structures in mainstream cultural expressions such as literature and new media to destabilize the myth of consanguinity among communities in Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan. By rethinking the implications of concepts such as the familiar and the familial, I examine how queer identities and queerness can unsettle the dominant discourse of heteronormative kinship and its marginalization of minority groups such as the LGBTQ communities in non-rights-based societies. I will focus on two examples, a campaign video for an LGBTQ rally in Singapore and the diary novel, A Wife’s Diary by Taiwanese lesbian writer Chen Xue, to exemplify how queer subjects navigate and negotiate a liveable space within the institution of family and the nation state. My attempt is to map out a regional topography of inter-Asian queer relationalities that reflect a set of spatial politics which seeks to reconfigure the heteronormative home and national space.

E. K. Tan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of English, and Asian and Asian American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative and World Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World. His essays have also appeared in publications such as Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies. Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities, Journal of Modern Chinese Literature, and Journal of Chinese Cinemas. He is currently working on two separate book projects tentatively titled Queer Homecoming in Sinophone Cultures and Mandarinization and Its Impact on Sinophone Cultural Production.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Joyce Tan, Diversity Initiatives Specialist, Student Life, NYU Shanghai.

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• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
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• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

New York Global Asia Colloquium Pandemic in the Gulf

New York Global Asia Colloquium
Pandemic in the Gulf

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
October 23, 9:00 - 10:30 AM (New York)
October 24, 5:00 - 6:30 PM (Abu Dhabi)
October 24, 9:00 - 10:30 PM (Shanghai)

Global Asia Colloquium
Fall 2020
COME ONE AND COME ALL !!!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23:
Indian Immigration, Labor, and COVID-19 in the Gulf.

Research presentations on the experiences of middle class Indians in the UAE and Qatar, by Neha Vora (Lafayette College) and on Indian laborers in the UAE, by Andrea Wright (William and Mary), with discussant, Dina Siddiqi (NYU), introduced by David Ludden (NYUNY and NYUAD).

The global pandemic has intensified inequalities globally. In the Arabian Peninsula, the coronavirus pandemic has taken a particularly heavy toll on immigrant populations. In the case of immigrants who work as manual laborers and live in dormitory housing, the pandemic has heightened their concerns over unemployment, deportation, and infection. Middle-class immigrants, too, contend with rising unemployment and many have chosen to return to India. In addition, xenophobia is on the rise in Gulf countries as all residents are living in a state of heightened insecurity. In this discussion, Andrea Wright and Neha Vora will explore how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted Indian diasporic communities, their employment, and their everyday lives in the Gulf. We will introduce audience members to our research among different Indian immigrant populations and explore how our interlocutors are affected by state and local responses to the pandemic.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
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• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Viewing Mocha from Sea, Air, and Land

Viewing Mocha from Sea, Air, and Land

Speaker: Nancy Um, Binghamton University
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
October 24, 9:00 - 10:30 AM (Shanghai)
October 23, 9:00 - 10:30 PM (New York)
October 24, 5:00 - 6:30 AM (Abu Dhabi)

In the seventeenth century, port city vistas emerged as popular imagery that frequently accompanied maritime travelogues and merchant narratives, proliferated actively by Dutch presses. While the texts of these books have been scrutinized, their accompanying images require closer examination. In this talk, I will take up several views of the port city of Mocha, on the Red Sea coast of Yemen, from that era. They include iconic printed images which originated in the Netherlands, but also an Indian painting workshop. These varied representations will be treated in conversation with each other and explored through the complicated relationships that they sustained between port city spaces, travel narratives, and image genres in the seventeenth century, a time when Red Sea and Indian Ocean travel, for both trade and pilgrimage, generated considerable visual interest.

Nancy Um is professor of art history at Binghamton University. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Her first book, The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009), relies upon a cross-section of visual, architectural, and textual sources to present the early modern coastal city of Mocha as a space that was nested within wider world networks, structured to communicate with far-flung ports and cities across a vast matrix of exchange. Her second book, Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Order of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), explores the material practices and informal social protocols that undergirded the overseas trade in 18th C Yemen.

Um’s articles have appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, African Arts, Northeast African Studies, Journal of Early Modern History, Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture, Art History, and Getty Research Journal. She has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Getty Foundation, and the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Book Launch | China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet

Book Launch | China Goes Green:
Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2020
Time: 19:00 - 20:30 Shanghai

Book Abstract

What does it mean for the future of the planet when one of the world’s most durable authoritarian governance systems pursues “ecological civilization”? Despite its staggering pollution and colossal appetite for resources, China exemplifies a model of state-led environmentalism which concentrates decisive political, economic, and epistemic power under centralized leadership. On the face of it, China seems to embody hope for a radical new approach to environmental governance.

In this thought-provoking bookYifei Li and Judith Shapiro probe the concrete mechanisms of China’s coercive environmentalism to show how “going green” helps the state to further other agendas such as citizen surveillance and geopolitical influence. Through top-down initiatives, regulations, and campaigns to mitigate pollution and environmental degradation, the Chinese authorities also promote control over the behavior of individuals and enterprises, pacification of borderlands, and expansion of Chinese power and influence along the Belt and Road and even into the global commons. Given the limited time that remains to mitigate climate change and protect millions of species from extinction, we need to consider whether a green authoritarianism can show us the way. This book explores both its promises and risks.

Yifei Li is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at NYU Shanghai and Global Network Assistant Professor at NYU. In the 2020-2021 academic year, he is also Residential Fellow at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich. His research concerns both the macro-level implications of Chinese environmental governance for state-society relations, marginalized populations, and global ecological sustainability, as well as the micro-level bureaucratic processes of China’s state interventions into the environmental realm. He has received research support from the United States National Science Foundation, the University of Chicago Center in Beijing, and the China Times Cultural Foundation, among other extramural sources. He is coauthor (with Judith Shapiro) of China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet. His recent work appears in Current SociologyInternational Journal of Urban and Regional ResearchEnvironmental SociologyJournal of Environmental Management, and other scholarly outlets. He received his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Bachelor’s from Fudan University.

Judith Shapiro is the director of the Masters in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development for the School of International Service at American University. She was one of the first Americans to live in China after U.S.-China relations were normalized in 1979, and taught English at the Hunan Teachers’ College in Changsha, China. She has also taught at Villanova, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Aveiro (Portugal) and the Southwest Agricultural University in Chongqing, China. She is a visiting professor at Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University. Professor Shapiro’s research and teaching focus on global environmental politics and policy, the environmental politics of Asia, and Chinese politics under Mao. She is the author, co-author or editor of nine books, including China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet (Polity 2020), China’s Environmental Challenges (Polity 2016), Mao’s War against Nature (Cambridge University Press 2001), Son of the Revolution (with Liang Heng, Knopf 1983), After the Nightmare (with Liang Heng, Knopf 1987), Cold Winds, Warm Winds: Intellectual Life in China Today (with Liang Heng, Wesleyan University Press 1987), Debates on the Future of Communism (co-edited with Vladimir Tismaneanu, Palgrave 1991), and, together with her mother Joan Hatch Lennox, Lifechanges: How Women Can Make Courageous Choices (Random House, 1991). Dr. Shapiro earned her Ph.D. from American University’s School of International Service. She holds an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley and another M.A. in Comparative Literature from the University of Illinois, Urbana. Her B.A. from Princeton University is in Anthropology and East Asian Studies. 

Introduction by Maria Montoya, Dean of Arts and Science, Global Network Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai Associate Professor of History, NYU.

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