Asian Embodiment of a White Canon: Shakespeare and East Asia

Asian Embodiment of a White Canon: Shakespeare and East Asia

Speaker: Alexa Alice Joubin
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-11-11 | 20:30-22:00 (Shanghai)
2021-11-11 | 7:30-9:00 (New York)
2021-11-11 | 16:30-18:00 (Abu Dhabi)

How do actors reposition their racialized bodies on stage and on screen? How did Akira Kurosawa influence George Lucas’ Star Wars? Why do critics repeatedly use the adjective Shakespearean to describe Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite (2019)? How do East Asian cinema and theatre portray vocal disability? How do Korean transgender cinema and East Asian feminism transform gender identities in Shakespeare? Bringing film and theatre studies together, this presentation sheds new light on the two major genres in a comparative context and reveals deep connections among Asian and Anglophone performances.

The talk is based on Alexa Alice Joubin’s new book, Shakespeare and East Asia (Oxford University Press, 2021). The book identifies four themes that distinguish post-1950s East Asian cinemas and theatres from works in other parts of the world: Japanese formalistic innovations in sound and spectacle; reparative adaptations from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong; the politics of gender and reception of films and touring productions in South Korea and the UK; and multilingual, diaspora works in Singapore and the UK. These adaptations are reshaping debates about the relationship between East Asia and Europe, and this book reveals deep connections among Asian and Anglophone performances.

Further Reading

Alexa Alice Joubin writes about race, gender, and cultural globalization. She teaches in the Departments of English, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Theatre, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., where she co-founded and co-directs the Digital Humanities Institute. Her latest book, Shakespeare and East Asia, was published by Oxford University Press in 2021. She co-authored Race with Martin Orkin, which was published in Routledge’s New Critical Idiom series in 2019.

You can follow her work at https://ajoubin.org/

Introduction by Anandi Rao, Global Perspectives on Society Postdoctoral Fellow at NYU Shanghai.

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The Silk Road: Connecting Histories and Futures

The Silk Road: connecting histories and futures

Speaker: Tim Winter
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-10-30 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-10-30 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-10-30 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-10-30 | 20:00-21:30 (Perth)

Today the Silk Road is rapidly becoming one of the key geocultural and geostrategic concepts of the twenty-first century. A narrative of connected histories, it now operates as a platform for international trade, diplomacy, infrastructure development and digital connectivity. Identified by two principal routes – maritime and overland, the Silk Road stretches across the Indian Ocean and Eurasian landmass; regions that will be of paramount importance in an increasingly multi-polar world.

In the Silk Road-Belt and Road nexus an architecture of cooperation has emerged that utilises discourses of civilisational dialogue, shared heritage, and a language of South-South cooperation built around solidarity and mutual-understanding.

This presentation asks how we should make sense of such developments and modes of connectivity. Moving beyond increasingly tired accounts of soft power, the talk argues China’s Silk Road internationalism carries world ordering implications.

Tim Winter is an Australian Research Council Professorial Future Fellow, UWA and Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. His interdisciplinary work seeks to understand how histories are constructed and reconstructed for public audiences and for diplomatic, geopolitical and nationalistic purposes. He has introduced the concept of geocultural power to the analysis of international affairs and has been at the forefront in the conceptual development of heritage diplomacy. This has led to current work on trends in cultural internationalism and the re-emergence of civilizational discourses via rising and middle powers across Eurasia. He is author of Geocultural Power: China’s Quest to Revive the Silk Roads for the Twenty First Century (University of Chicago Press 2019) and The Silk Road: connecting histories and futures (NY: Oxford University Press, 2022). See silkroadfutures.net.

Introduction by Maria Adele Carrai, Assistant Professor of Global China Studies at NYU Shanghai.

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• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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An Indian Historian in Dunhuang: Romila Thapar’s Visit to China in 1957

An Indian Historian in Dunhuang: Romila Thapar’s Visit to China in 1957
A dialogue between Romila Thapar, Tansen Sen, and Adhira Mangalagiri

Speaker: Romila Thapar, Tansen Sen, and Adhira Mangalagiri
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-10-20 | 19:30-21:00 (Shanghai)
2021-10-20 | 7:30-9:00 (New York)
2021-10-20 | 15:30-17:00 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-10-20 | 17:00-18:30 (New Delhi)

Inaugural China-India Dialogue Series,

co-hosted by the India China Institute, New School, and the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, NUS.

In 1957, renowned Indian historian Romila Thapar visited China, where, together with Sri Lankan art historian Anil de Silva, she worked at two cave sites that were the locations of Buddhist monasteries and shrines from the first millennium CE. The first site was the then lesser known Maijishan in north China, and the second was the famous site of Dunhuang on the edge of the Gobi desert in Northwest China. Now, decades later, she is supplementing the academic work that emerged from that trip with a captivating travelogue: Gazing Eastward takes readers back to midcentury China, through the observations that Thapar made in her diary during her time at the two archaeological sites and her trips there and to other sites. Traveling by train or truck, Thapar met people from throughout the country and all stations in society, from peasants on a cooperative farm to Chairman Mao himself. An enchanting document of a long-lost era, Gazing Eastward is a marvel, a richly observed work of travel writing that brings a time and a place fully to life.

Romila Thapar is an emeritus professor of history at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and she was previously general president of the Indian History Congress. She is a fellow of the British Academy and holds honorary doctorates from Universities of Calcutta, Oxford University and the University of Chicago, among others. She is an Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and SOAS, London. In 2008, she was awarded the prestigious Kluge Prize from the Library of Congress.

Introduction by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Affiliated Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, NYU.

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The Construction of “Mainstream Islam”: the Politics of Orthodoxy and Nationalism in Post-1998 Indonesia

The Construction of “Mainstream Islam”: the Politics of Orthodoxy and Nationalism in Post-1998 Indonesia

Speaker: Saskia Schäfer
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-10-13 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-10-13 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-10-13 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-10-13 | 13:00-14:30 (Berlin)

It is common in present-day Indonesia to hear talk of “Islam Mainstream,” which is taken – both by its adherents and critics – to be the successful consolidation of previously more diverse Muslim practices in recent Indonesian society. But how did this consolidation come about and what effects does it have? This talk will offer a discussion about the trajectory and imbrication of Islam and politics in post-reform Indonesia, and will offer some explanations for how the increased homogenization of Islam has been the result of a number of factors, some better known than others. I will argue that it’s only by understanding how a variety of different discourses — from that of Islamism to that of human rights — have influenced each other that we can grasp how Islam in Indonesia has become the bidding ground for multiple sets of competitive religio-political actors.

Saskia Schäfer (BA/MA Humboldt-Universität, PhD Freie Universität Berlin) works on politics and society in the Malay-speaking archipelago. She currently leads a research group on Islam and Democracy in Indonesia and Turkey at Humboldt-Universität in Berlin, where she teaches courses on democracy, literature, and politics. Her academic work has appeared in Critical Asian Studies and Pacific Affairs, and her public writing has been featured in the New York Times and the Guardian Long Read. She is currently completing a book manuscript, “True Islam and the Politics of Orthodoxy: Ahmadiyya, Shia, and Blasphemy in Indonesia”.

Introduction by Zainab Mahmood, Assistant Professor Faculty Fellow of Liberal Studies at NYU Shanghai.

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Beyond the Two Shores: Literature, Decolonization and the Cold War

Beyond the Two Shores: Literature, Decolonization and the Cold War

Speaker: Francesca Orsini
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-9-29 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-9-29 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-9-29 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-9-29 | 13:00-14:30 (London)

In her recent monograph At Penpoint: African Literature, Postcolonial Studies, and the Cold War, Monica Popescu convincingly argues for restoring the Cold War as the background and shaping element of decolonizing struggles. What the Cold War and the decolonization period show so crucially (and excitingly, for literary scholars) is how seriously literature was taken at the time, and how instrumental print cultures were considered to wage and advance certain struggles and ideas. If the Cold War weaponized literature and was predicated on its power and agency, decolonial and postcolonial struggles were also fought ‘at penpoint’.  Indeed, much has been written on Cold War literature, though until recently mainly from the perspectives of the USA, Soviet Russia, and China. But was the “rest” of the literary world of Asia, Africa, and Latin America merely a battlefield for rival ideologies, falling under either American or Soviet influence? Such a perspective is not only acutely Eurocentric, it also does not do justice to the vitality of literary activism in the decolonizing world, and to the multiple ways by which Third-World print cultures broke free from Cold War antagonisms, and from imperial superpowers. Restoring the Cold War as one of the important genealogies of decolonizing and post-colonial struggles is critical to understanding the emergence of new literary aesthetics and internationalisms at the time, and to make sense of the complexity and vitality of Third-World print cultures and of the debates and tensions (between or across ideologies and forms) that shaped them. It also makes us appreciate the challenges many Third-World, postcolonial writers faced, and the significance of the aesthetic, editorial and political choices they made.

This talk will consider the Cold War as the background and condition that enabled Indian literary magazines of the 1960s to open up to African and other Third World literatures as never before. It will particularly focus on a mainstream Hindi short story magazine, Sarika (Starling), and its editor Kamleshwar’s attempt to re-orient world literature and fashion a committed but autonomous aesthetics that went ‘beyond the two shores’.

Francesca Orsini is Professor emerita of Hindi and South Asian Literature at SOAS, University of London, a Fellow of the British Academy, and the author of The Hindi Public Sphere (2002) and Print and Pleasure (2009). She is interested in literary multilingualism in the longue durée and has just finished a book on the multilingual literary history of North India, a research project (funded by the European Research Council) called Multilingual Locals and Significant Geographies: for a new approach to world literature from the perspective of North India, the Maghreb, and the Horn of Africa, and an edited volume on Hinglish (with Ravikant). She co-edits with Debjani Ganguly the Cambridge Studies in World Literatures and Cultures, and is an editor of the Journal of World Literature.

Introduction by Adhira Mangalagiri, Lecturer in Comparative Literature, Queen Mary University of London; Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Globa Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
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• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

The Light of Asia: Sir Edwin Arnold and his Biography of the Buddha

The Light of Asia : Sir Edwin Arnold and his Biography of the Buddha
A dialogue between Jairam Ramesh and Tansen Sen

Speaker: Jairam Ramesh & Tansen Sen
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-9-15 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-9-15 | 16:30-18:00 (New Delhi)
2021-9-15 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-9-15 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

‘The Light of Asia‘ is an epic poem by Sir Edwin Arnold that was first published in 1879. It is a narrative of the life and message of the Buddha. It quickly became a huge sensation and has continued to resonate powerfully across the world over the last century and a half. The poem captivated an Indian monk who remains an iconic personality-Swami Vivekananda. At about the same time, it deeply moved a young man in Colombo who has become famous in history as Anagarika Dharmapala. It caught the attention of an aspiring Indian lawyer in London in 1889. This man later became immortal as Mahatma Gandhi. A few years hence it impacted a teenager in Allahabad who would, in 1947, become the first Prime Minister of India-Jawaharlal Nehru. Two copies of the book adorned the bookshelves of B.R. Ambedkar, the prime architect of the Indian constitution.

Weaving together literary, cultural, political and social history, Jairam Ramesh uncovers and narrates the fascinating story of this deeply consequential and compelling poem that has shaped our thinking of an ancient sage and his teachings.

Jairam Ramesh brings into this unusual narrative the life of the multi-faceted poet himself who, among other things, was steeped in Sanskrit literature. Sir Edwin Arnold’s English rendering of the Bhagavad Gita was one of Mahatma Gandhi’s abiding favourites. Sir Edwin was also in many ways the man who shaped Bodh Gaya as we know it today.

Jairam Ramesh, a Rajya Sabha MP, was Union minister between 2006 and 2014, holding several key portfolios including environment and forests. He is the author of several well-known books including Indira Gandhi: A Life in Nature and Intertwined Lives: P.N. Haksar and Indira Gandhi. His last book, A Chequered Brilliance: The Many Lives of V.K. Krishna Menon won the Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay NIF Book Prize 2020.

Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

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• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia Receives Second Three-Year Luce Foundation Grant

NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia Receives Second Three-Year Luce Foundation Grant

The Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai would like to announce the receipt of a second three-year (2021–2024), $450,000 grant to New York University from the Henry Luce Foundation, which will be divided equally among NYU campuses in New York, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai, in order to continue developing a research and teaching apparatus for studies of Asia as an open space of expansive mobility, connectivity, and territorial transformation. At NYU Shanghai we will use the funds to continue examining port-cities networking and coastal environments in the Indian Ocean world and start a new interdisciplinary research project on the Belt and Road Initiative. We also plan to organize summer schools in 2023 and 2024. We are grateful to the Henry Luce Foundation and the University leadership at all three campuses for their support for securing this grant.

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News ASC Blog Ke Zhang

Serial interviews on Asian Studies in China
Asia Research Center, Fudan University

Amid the rapidly increasing engagement between China and the world, when the importance of Chinese Studies have been receiving more appreciation and recognition outside China, Chinese academia has as well strived to learn more about the world, especially Asia. The discipline of Asian Studies has also witnessed some tremendous development in China.

In this series of interviews by the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai, we aim to provide insights on how Asian Studies has developed over the years in China and the current landscape of the discipline through the dialogues with some scholars who have made outstanding achievements in Asian Studies in Chinese universities.

In the first entry of this series, we interviewed Dr Zhang Ke, Associate Professor of Department of History at Fudan University, who works at the Asia Research Center, Fudan University.

1. Why did Fudan University decide to establish the Asia Research Center (ARCFD)? What is  the ARCFD’s place in Fudan’s organisational structure?  Where does the funding for the ARCFD come from?

The Asia Research Center, Fudan University was officially established in 2002, thanks to the plan of the Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies (KFAS) to set up Asian studies centers in collaboration with prominent universities in China to boost Asian Studies in and outside China. Fudan University was among the first institutions that received funding from the KFAS to set up Asian Studies centers. Fudan University has continuously provided support for the operation of the ARCFD.

The Asia Research Center, Fudan University is an independent platform for research within the university, mainly covering a variety of programmes in humanity and social science disciplines. The funding of the ARCFD mainly comes from the KFAS, and the Chey Institute for Advanced Studies (CIAS), the successor of the KFAS, after 2019. 

2. Does receiving support from the KFAS influence the focus and gravity of the ARCFD? Does the ARCFD collaborate with its Korean partners in the daily operation?

The KFAS has supported more than ten universities in China to establish Asian Studies centers. However, the KFAS does not interfere with each center’s specific operation and planning. The ARCFD has constantly maintained a good relationship with the KFAS (CIAS) and therefore has always emphasized the researches on Korean language and culture and Sino-Korean exchanges, leading to the publication and translation of many relevant academic works.

Generally, the ARCFD operates independently and regularly reports to the KFAS (CIAS) and Fudan University on its progress and expenditure.

3. How does the ARCFD operate?

The ARCFD is jointly managed by Fudan University and the KFAS (CIAS). The Principal of Fudan and the Chairman of the KFAS (CIAS) both take the role of the Chairman. The structure of the ARCFD includes bodies such as the governing board and the academic council. The Center regularly organizes meetings for planning. The daily operation is taken in the hands of the Director and the team. Every year, the ARCFD regularly sponsors Fudan scholars’ Asian Studies projects, organizes academic conferences, publishes academic works, translations and collections, and pushes collaboration with internal and external research institutions.

4. Which Asian region does the ARCFD focus on? Given the results of project grants in recent years, does the ARCFD prefer the researches on East Asia?

The ARCFD has not in principle committed to specifically focusing on any regions in Asia. Nevertheless, among the project grants in recent years, projects on East Asian studies do account for a higher portion and a bigger total number. This is in line with the general picture of Asian Studies in China. In the future, the ARCFD will put more emphasis on the balance among subjects of studies, and consider sponsoring some “neglected” projects which received little attention.

5. Does the ARCFD provide students and scholars with relevant language training?

The ARCFD prioritizes academic research with little involvement in teaching. The scholars have already possessed good language skills. The ARCFD currently does not plan to conduct language trainings.

6. Given the presence of other institutions relevant to Asian Studies in Fudan University, such as Japan Research Center, Korea Research Center and Center for Asian Economic Research, does research areas of the ARCFD intersect with these institutions’? Does the ARCFD collaborate with these institutions?

Since its establishment, the ARCFD has constantly emphasized collaboration and interaction with other institutions in Fudan, certainly including Japan Research Center, Korea Research Center, etc. The collaboration includes sponsorship of relevant research projects, joint publications of collections and translations of academic works, joint organization of academic conferences and invitation of relevant scholars to be members of academic and review committees.

7. How does the  ARCFD collaborate and interact with other Asian Studies centers in and outside China?

The ARCFD and other Asian Studies Centers in China are all members of the Asian Studies network supported by the KFAS (CIAS) and hold regular exchanges. Every year, a joint meeting of the Directors of each Asian Studies centers is held, where all the centers discuss their works and progress. The collaboration between the ARCFD and the Asia Pacific Research Institute, Peking University is the longest and closest one. The two have been regularly organizing academic forums and young scholars conferences for more than ten years.

8. Could you please briefly talk about the development of Asian Studies in China? What role has the ARCFD played in the process?

Overall, there has been a lot of progress in the field of Asian Studies in China, especially in East Asian Studies. In recent years, academia has made a leap in the studies of Southeast Asia, South Asia, Inner Asia and West Asia. Personally, I think the future direction of the field is to: first, focus on integrating the studies of all these regions to discuss interaction and communication of the substance and values within Asia; second, think about the concepts such as Asian values and Asian community with shared future as a whole to lay the foundation for reshaping Asian identity in the future. The ARCFD expects to work towards these two directions while maintaining the existing traditions to amplify the influence.

9. Has the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) brought more opportunities to the ARCFD? How does the BRI influence the operation of the ARCFD?

The BRI has indeed benefited the ARCFD and other Asian Studies centers with lots of fresh development opportunities in recent years. Focusing on the new problems emerging from the BRI, the ARCFD supports various academic conferences and research projects, some of which emphasizing theoretical researches while some focusing on practical ones. The ARCFD hopes to play its and Fudan’s strengths to make intellectual contributions to the BRI with the researches in the disciplines of humanity such as history, culture, geography and religion on the one hand, and to actively support the policy researches on international relations and development of political economy on the other.

10.

In the last two years, the Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of isolationism and nationalism in every country have generally presented great challenges to ‘Asian Studies’, and the ARCFD is no exception. The pandemic has caused lots of troubles to academic exchanges in and outside China, as a lot of interactions could only be conducted online and some projects had to be suspended. However, the changing international political landscape has instead stressed the urgency and values of rebuilding the ‘regional community’. The ARCFD hopes to strengthen the researches on the topics like ‘Intra-Asian exchanges’ and ‘Reshaping Asian values’ to excel at ‘working ahead of the times’ and pave the foundation in the face of the development and changes of the future political landscape.

11. Compared with the beginning years, how has the ARCFD developed over the years? Do you think where and how can it improve in the future?

Almost twenty years ago, when the ARCFD was just established, there lacked a shared platform for different Asian Studies disciplines in Fudan University. There was no adequate funding for research projects, academic publishing and organizing conferences as well. It was about the time when the ARCFD was set up. The Center has provided a lot of Fudan scholars, young emerging ones in particular, with precious assistance for research funds and platforms in all these years, enabling them to publish a number of works on a variety of topics. Compared with its initial years, nowadays the ARCFD has set up an extensive network among both scholars and institutions, which marks the greatest development of the Center.

In the future, the first thing to focus on is the dimension of theories and the Center’s directions. Amid the rapid changes in and outside China, there will be much more to work on how to reshape Asian values and identity, reiterate the meaning of ‘Asia’ and tell good Asian stories. The ARCFD hopes to support relevant researches in this aspect. The second is about the specific operation. The Center hopes to gradually resume the pre-pandemic operation and development in the next few years to keep working on the existing projects and expand the network of external collaboration.

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

ATTCAT 2021

ATTCAT 2021

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-6-11 to 2021-6-14
2021-6-18 to 2021-6-20
20:30-23:30 (Shanghai)

中國古代建築術語注釋與翻譯工作坊暨國際研討會

The International Workshop & Symposium on Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology

In Collaboration With

School of Architecture, Southeast University 東南大學建築學院

Key Scientific Research Base of Technology of Traditional Wooden Architecture (Southeast University), State Administration for Cultural Heritage, China 傳統木構建築營造技藝研究國家文物局重點科研基地 (東南大學)

Vanderbilt University 範德堡大學

Organizers

Chen Wei, Professor, Southeast University  陳薇,東南大學,中國

Tracy Miller, Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University  梅晨曦,範德堡大學,美國

Zhuge Jing, Associate Professor, Southeast University  諸葛淨,東南大學,中國

Lala Zuo, Associate Professor, NYU Shanghai  左拉拉,上海紐約大學,中國

Program Overview

中國建築是世界建築的重要部分,尤其中國古代建築,一直吸引著各國學者的關注與研究。但是,由於中國古代建築的術語較為晦澀難懂,跨語境學術討論中不可避免的術語翻譯,更增加了交流與理解的複雜性,成為學界研究中國古代建築的障礙,也不利更廣泛的人們理解中國古代建築的價值。

有鑑於此,東南大學陳薇、範德堡大學梅晨曦Tracy Miller及東南大學諸葛淨共同發起“中國傳統建築術語注釋與翻譯(The Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology,簡稱ATTCAT)”國際合作計畫,並每年舉辦工作坊與研討會,通過來自不同文化與語言背景的學者的共同研討,推進對中國古代建築術語的跨語境研究,加強對術語的共同認知。研討成果逐步通過開源數據庫(https://architecturasinica.org)與公眾分享。

本研討會已於2018年以及2019年成功舉辦了兩屆。因疫情與旅行限制,2020年的研討會被迫取消。2021年的研討會由上海紐約大學左拉拉組織,改於Zoom線上會議平臺舉行。

Chinese architecture is a critical component of global architectural heritage. Scholars of historic architecture around the world have been particularly fascinated by China’s traditional timber-frame system. However, the idiosyncratic technical terminology used to describe this system of building has long been an obstacle for scholars. Native and non-native speakers alike find it challenging to fully understand the terms and translate them into modern parlance and across cultural divides. Without a full understanding of the vocabulary used to describe Chinese architectural elements, this rich tradition remains largely inaccessible to an ever-expanding public interested in visiting, and more deeply understanding, China’s cultural heritage sites.

In the light of this, a group of scholars and architectural historians, led by Professor CHEN Wei (Southeast University, China), Professor Tracy Miller (Vanderbilt University, USA), and Professor ZHUGE Jing (Southeast University, China), initiated an international collaboration called the Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology (ATTCAT). The ATTCAT project is a workshop that meets annually and brings scholars from different countries and cultures together to study the meaning of technical terms in traditional Chinese architecture and develop full annotated translations with bibliographic references. By then publishing revised annotations in open-access databases, the ATTCAT project seeks to advance a common knowledge of Chinese architectural terminology and the heritage it describes.

The ATTCAT Workshop has been successfully hosted twice, first in 2018 and then in 2019. Although the 2020 workshop was canceled due to the pandemic, we are happy to announce that the 2021 workshop will be hosted by NYU Shanghai and organized by Professor Lala Zuo (NYU Shanghai). The event will take place over Zoom across two weekends: June 11-14; and then again from June 18-20.

Participants

Bai Ying 白穎 | Southeast University 東南大學

Benda, Yuh-Fen 許玉棻 | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Campbell, Aurelia 金田 | Boston College 波士頓學院

Chen Wei 陳薇 | Southeast University 東南大學

Harrer, Alexandra 荷雅麗 | Tsinghua University 清華大學

Jia Tingli 賈亭立 | Southeast University 東南大學

Liu Yan 劉妍 | Kunming University of Science and Technology 昆明理工大學

Miller, Tracy 梅晨曦 | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Murphy, Kevin | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Ruitenbeek, Klass 魯克斯 | Asian Art Museum, Berlin 亞洲藝術博物館(柏林)

Steinhardt, Nancy 夏南悉 | University of Pennsylvania 賓夕法尼亞大學

Sun Xiaoqian 孫曉倩 | Southeast University 東南大學

Tang Cong 唐聰 | Chongqing University 重慶大學

Yan Wencheng 顏文成 | Independent Scholar 獨立學者

Yu Lina 俞莉娜 | Peking University 北京大學

Zhuge Jing 諸葛淨 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zuo Lala 左拉拉 | New York University Shanghai 上海紐約大學

Zwerger, Klaus | Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) 維也納工業大學

Student Participants

Cao Yiming 曹一鳴 | Southeast University 東南大學

Chen Baolong 陳寶龍 | New York University 紐約大學

Ding Boyi 丁伯儀 | Vienna University of Technology 維也納工業大學

Fu Shiyi 付詩怡 | Southeast University 東南大學

Guo Mian 郭勉 | Southeast University 東南大學

Hong Yun 洪雲 | Southeast University 東南大學

Jiang Jiayuan 蔣嘉元 | Southeast University 東南大學

Li Ke 李珂 | Southeast University 東南大學

Liu Shuo 劉碩 | Southeast University 東南大學

Miu Tongqian 繆彤茜 | Southeast University 東南大學

Wang Yuanyuan 王媛媛 | Southeast University 東南大學

Xie Qizhen 謝祺錚 | Southeast University 東南大學

Ye Cong 葉聰 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhang Jing 張靖 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhang Xu 張旭 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhao Yue 趙越 | Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH) 蘇黎世聯邦理工學院

Zhao Yuqian 趙與謙 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zheng Qian 鄭倩 | Vienna University of Technology 維也納工業大學

Zhou Jun 周俊 | Southeast University 東南大學

Technical Support

For any Zoom related question, please contact the Program Associate, Baolong Chen (bc3049@nyu.edu )

Language: English, Chinese

By invitation only.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Which Global? Circulating Chinese Drama and Theatre in Europe, the Americas, and Southeast Asia

Which Global? Circulating Chinese Drama and Theatre in Europe, the Americas, and Southeast Asia

Speaker: Josh Stenberg
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-5-4 | 18:00-19:30 (Shanghai)
2021-5-4 | 6:00-7:30 (New York)
2021-5-4 | 14:00-15:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Whether from states, promoters, or observers, there is a great deal of enthusiasm about the circulation of Chinese culture abroad, not least in contemporary cultural diplomacy projects. High-flown abstractions do not always translate to attention toward either the cultural product that is travelling (e.g. a dramatic text or narrative, or a performance troupe or practice) or to the society where it arrives. This presentation considers a variety of transnational circulations, including 19th century theatre translation in France, a 1960 performance tour of Jingju (Beijing opera) to Canada, and a contemporary Chinese-origin puppetry practice in Indonesia to reconsider what these circulations actually mean, and what determines how Chinese culture is received on arrival in various socio-historical contexts.

Josh Stenberg is a Senior Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney. He worked as foreign liaison for the Jiangsu Kunqu Company from 2001 to 2004 and studied and taught in Nanjing again from 2011 to 2015. He is the author of Minority Stages: Sino-Indonesian Performance and Public Display (University of Hawai’i, 2019) and the translator or editor of several volumes of Chinese fiction in translation. 

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Recommended Reading:

How far does the sound of a Pipa carry? Broadway adaptation of a Chinese classical drama

Wayang potehi: Glove puppets in the expression of Sino-lndonesian identity

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

Speaker: Rebecca Ehrenwirth
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-27 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-27 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-4-27 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

When Sinophone-Thai authors Sima Gong and Zeng Xin were born in the 1930s in Bangkok, they were not Sinophone writers yet. They did not even learn to speak Chinese until they were children, respectively teenagers. However, nowadays they count among the most prolific and popular Sino-Thai authors despite their rather high age. So when did they become Sinophone writers in Thailand and why?

In this talk I will discuss the importance of narrative self-making and metafiction in Sinophone literature in Thailand. I will mostly focus on flash fiction and poems by the two mentioned authors to exemplify not only how Sinophone writers try to (de-)construct their identities as Sinophone, Thai and as writers in Thailand but also how they struggle with their multiple identities in every day life.

Rebecca Ehrenwirth is an Assistant Professor of Translation (Chinese-German) at the University of Applied Sciences/SDI Munich and teaches at Jilin International Studies University in Changchun. She received her Ph.D. in Sinology from Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. Her research focuses on Sinophone literature (mainly in Southeast Asia), postcolonial studies, Queer film studies, contemporary Chinese art and film, as well as creative teaching techniques. Her book on Contemporary Sinophone Literature in Thailand was published in 2018 with Harrassowitz in Germany; a journal article on Intertextuality in Sino-Thai literature has just been published in the latest issue of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. She is currently working on an article on the Shanghai Queer Film Festival and co-editing a book on Contemporary German-Chinese Cultures in Dialogue which will be published in 2023 with Springer.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-17 | 9:00-10:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-16 | 21:00-22:30 (New York)
2021-4-17 | 5:00-6:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

Venue: Room 1502-04, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai & Zoom
Date : April 16-17, 2021

– Overview

The Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World” brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYUSH to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. The Symposium is designed so that early career scholars can explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work. 

– Keynote Address

Title: Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho | Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History, Duke University. Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Date & Time: Saturday, April 17, 2021  | 9:00-10:30 AM Shanghai

Venue: Room 1502-04, NYU Shanghai & Zoom Webinar 

Abstract

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Speaker Info

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

*NYU Community Only Event

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Speaker: Liang Luo
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-13 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-13 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-4-13 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)