4th CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium Asia and the World

4th CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium
‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-4-29 to 2022-4-30

The Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ is co-sponsored by NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia and the GPS program, which brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYU Shanghai to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. This is the fourth year of the symposium and it is designed for scholars in their early career to explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work. The participants will focus on topics on history, art, literature, society, archaeology, anthropology and cultural studies, and examine and expand the ever-changing intellectual boundaries of academic scholarship on China, Asia and the broader world. This year, in order to mark the 10th anniversary of the establishment of NYU Shanghai, we will also have participants, young scholars as well as faculty members, from Peking University, Tsinghua University, and Renmin University of China, who will share their research on the study of Asia. The objective is to eventually make the Young Scholars Symposium an annual pan-China event and showcase NYU Shanghai‚Äôs contribution to the study of Asia.

*By invitation only

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To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Rethinking the Everyday: Approaching Asia-Africa through Daily Life and Popular Cultures

Rethinking the Everyday:
Approaching Asia-Africa through Daily Life and Popular Cultures

Speaker: Ying Cheng
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-4-29 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2022-4-29 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2022-4-29 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

What happens when an African audience watches Indian or Chinese films on Saturday nights? What exactly a Chinese student gets out of a seminar about youth dance culture in West Africa?

The presentation draws attention to current studies on the transnational cultural flows between Asia and Africa that have been largely ignored in dominant discourses of postcolonialism and globalisation. I try to illustrate how popular culture functions as an essential site of mutual representation and knowledge production within a Third World context. Popular culture forms exemplify ‚Äėthe episteme of the everyday‚Äô (Newell and Okome, 2014) that speaks to ordinary people‚Äôs concerns, values, desires and desperations. The transnational circulations of pop cultural forms not only shape people‚Äôs imagination of self and other, but provoke alternative imaginaries of modernities and globalisation within a Southern context.¬†

The presentation calls for a southern, comparative theoretical endeavour among scholars of Asian and African studies: From which kind of shared daily experiences are the ‚ÄėAfrican-Asian affinities‚Äô (Jean-Fran√ßois and Jeychandran, 2022) generated? How could we think of Asia-Africa as an epistemological framework that challenges traditional models of academic theorisation in area studies and other disciplines? And how could we reactivate our academic debates with languages or ‚Äėvernaculars‚Äô rooted in the lifeworld of Asia and Africa?

Ying Cheng is an assistant professor in the Department of Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Peking University. Her research interests include youth and popular culture in Africa, African visual and performance arts, cultural interactions between China and Africa, and so on. Dr Ying Cheng is an editorial board member of the Journal of African Cultural Studies. She has also been a research associate (Arts of Africa and the Souths) of Rhodes University, South Africa since 2017. In recent years, she has published articles in African Arts, Routledge Handbook of African Literature, African Theatre, Journal of African Culture Studies and so on.

Introduction by M. Yunus RAFIQ, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-17 | 9:00-10:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-16 | 21:00-22:30 (New York)
2021-4-17 | 5:00-6:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean ‚Äď their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ

Venue: Room 1502-04, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai & Zoom
Date : April 16-17, 2021

– Overview

The Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYUSH to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. The Symposium is designed so that early career scholars can explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work.¬†

– Keynote Address

Title: Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho | Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History, Duke University. Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Date & Time: Saturday, April 17, 2021  | 9:00-10:30 AM Shanghai

Venue: Room 1502-04, NYU Shanghai & Zoom Webinar 

Abstract

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean ‚Äď their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Speaker Info

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

*NYU Community Only Event

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Venue: Room 1100, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019
Time: 12:30 - 14:00 CST

The destruction of the Cham cities of Indrapura (982) and Vijaya (1471) constituted decisive ńźaŐ£i Vi√™t victories against Champa but it was not until 1832 that the last Cham territory of Panduranga was formally incorporated by the Nguy√™ŐÉn dynasty into Vietnam‚Äôs territory. This article elaborates on present-day reverberations of these three significant historical events in the entangled Vi√™Ő£t-Cham history. Rather than providing a historical interpretation of these turning-point events linked to particular dates, I offer an ethnographically informed analysis of lasting effects that these historical moments had in different localities and on various categories of people. Specifically, the article zooms in on two Cham communities spread across the South China Sea ‚Äď one located in the old territory of Panduranga (Vietnam), the other ‚Äď living in exile ‚Äď in Hainan (China). By introducing two different but overlapping Cham mythico-histories narrated in those communities, the study shows that the absence of an actual territory of Champa incited people to take different routes in reproducing the bonds that stand for their homeland, and ultimately for their redemption. Building on Liisa Malkki‚Äôs analytical framework in her study of displacement and exile, the article argues that for Cham people in Vietnam redemption was a transcendental act of recovering lost co-ethnic communities dispersed in the region, while for those in Hainan redemption was sought in enacting Islamic piety and in a combined, palimpsestic ethnic-religious homeland that included Champa as a place of origin but embraced China as the new homeland.

Edyta Roszko is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen, Norway, where she develops a new research direction on oceans. After her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology / Martin Luther University (Halle, Germany ‚Äď 2011) which focused on religion and politics in Vietnam, she did ethnographic research among Chinese and Vietnamese fishing communities in the common maritime space of the South China Sea. Bridging different historical periods and countries, the question of mobility, migration and connectivity of fishers compelled her to historicize fishing communities and to work beyond the nation-state and area studies frame. Edyta‚Äôs newly awarded European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant project¬†TransOcean¬†at Chr. Michelsen Institute expands her geographic field beyond Vietnam and China to include other global regions in Oceania and West and East Africa.

Edyta’s scholarly articles have appeared in Cross-Currents: East Asian history and Culture Review, Nations and Nationalism and Journal of Contemporary Ethnography and other journals. Her monograph Fishers, Monks and Cadres: Navigating State and Religious Authorities along Central Vietnam’s South China Sea Coast is forthcoming with NIAS Press (Copenhagen).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by ‚ÄčTzu-hui Celina Hung‚Äč, Assistant Professor of Literature at NYU Shanghai‚Äč.

NYU Shanghai community-only event. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP by Nov 12, 2019.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Venue: Room 503, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: November 5, 2019 to November 8, 2019
Time: 09:00 - 19:00 CST

Sponsored by the School of Art and Science, NYU Shanghai

Jointly organized by the Center for Global Asia/IMA of NYU Shanghai and Shanghai Museum

The workshop integrates cross-disciplinary dialogues with Buddhist deity/textile/Chinese calligraphy and painting restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It aims to raise the awareness of traditional conservation techniques, non-intrusive restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It also strives to deepen students’ knowledge of the physical and technical aspects of Buddhist artworks. Participants will engage in presentation, discussion and interact with the speakers, faculty members as well as conservators on site in NYU Shanghai. The workshop takes advantage of the rare opportunity to witness the practitioners and their life work for Buddhist objects from all over Asia, and learn about issues surrounding conservation, interpretation, and digital imaging.

In addition to familiarizing participants to the exhibitions and the unparalleled collection at the Shanghai Museum, the workshop will introduce them to the practices of the world-class conservation lab. Students are expected to complete readings assigned before the workshop and to complete a research project based on an object/ objects studied in Digital Heritage or Digital Conservation of Buddhist Deities course. The program is open to Institute students specializing in Asian art or Buddhist art as well as those whose projects relate closely to the Buddhist art of Asia.

  

Prof. Yabuuchi Satoshi | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Prof. Yamada Osumu | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Ms. Luo Xiyun | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Ms. Huang Ying | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Prof. Chen Wu-Wei | Assistant Arts Professor, NYU Shanghai 

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Partha Mitter

Venue: Room 310, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 28, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The lecture takes up the story of Indian artists and their encounter with global modernism. There is a serious imbalance in art history between Centre (the West) and Periphery (the Rest) that causes non-western artists to disappear under the global radar. This is a reflection of the complex discourse of western colonialism and the tendency to consider all non-western modernist art as mere adjuncts of western modernism. The three major artists that Partha Mitter will discuss ‚Äď Amrita Sher-Gil, Rabindranath Tagore and Jamini Roy ‚Äď showed striking originality and radical imagination. Yet they are hardly known to the West. This, Mitter argues, is not because of their intrinsic quality as such, but because they occupy a peripheral space within the history of global modernism. In this lecture, Mitter hopes to redress this imbalance that was true of all non-western modernism including China.

Partha Mitter is a writer and historian of art and culture, specialising in the reception of Indian art in the West, as well as in modernity, art and identity in India, and more recently in global modernism. He studied history at London University and did his doctorate with E. H. Gombrich (1970). He began his career as Junior Research Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge (1968-69) and Research Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge (1970-74). In 1974 he joined Sussex as a Lecturer in Indian History, retiring in 2002 as Professor in Art History.

His publications include¬†Much Maligned Monsters: History of European Reactions to Indian Art¬†(Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1977; Chicago University Press Paperback, 1992; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2013);¬†Art and Nationalism in Colonial India 1850-1922: Occidental Orientations¬†(Cambridge University Press, 1994);¬†Indian Art, Oxford Art History Series¬†(Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002);¬†The Triumph of Modernism: India‚Äôs Artists and the Avant-Garde ‚Äď 1922-1947¬†(Reaktion Books, London, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2007).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Duane Corpis, Area Head of Humanities & Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Asia, Humanities, The Provost’s Office, and The Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Venue: Room 808, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 21, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

Dancer and choreographer, Deepti Gupta, visits NYU Shanghai for an enlightening Kathak performance. Kathak is one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances, originated from Uttar Pradesh, India. This dance form traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient northern India, known as Kathaks, or storytellers. Deepti Gupta is visiting IMA to explore how contemporary technologies might connect with this traditional art-form. Join us in room 808 for a fascinating and visually engaging performance.

Building bridges between India and Canada, Deepti Gupta is a dancer and choreographer of the elegant Kathak style of Indian dance. A disciple of Sri Munna Lal Shukla, renowned guru of the Lucknow Gharana (lineage), she has recently been training and working under the guidance of Kathak legend Pundit Birju Maharaj.

Deepti holds an MA in Dance from York University, Toronto and is a noted scholar, teacher and choreographer both in Canada and in India. Her creative work has been recognized by many awards including a Chalmers Award, National Arts Centre commissions and a choreographic residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts.

Deepti’s choreographic work is at the cutting edge of contemporary South Asian dance and she has collaborated with a diverse range of international musicians, designers, and new media artists. Her work has been presented by Canada’s National Arts Centre, National Gallery of Canada, the Canada Dance Festival, Kalanidhi Fine Arts, Raga Mala of Canada, Banff Centre for the Arts, Tangente, Harbourfront Centre. Her work has also been presented internationally by Danspace Project & DTW, New York; Anila Sinha Foundation, International House, Chicago; Vasantotsav, Delhi; and the Panchatatva Festival Mumbai among others.

Deepti’s creations have been critically acclaimed in the New York Times, the Village Voice and Dance Connection Magazine. A relentless experimentalist with a variety of theatrical interests, she received the Dora Mavor Moore award for best costume design. She has worked extensively in Indian theatre as an actor, dramaturge and script writer. Deepti was recently a lecurer in the Aesthetics and Theory of Kathak at Kathak Kendra, National Institute of Kathak, New Delhi India.

Her recent works:

  • Silk Road Melody¬†‚Äď The performance celebrates the great literary and philosophical legacy created by Sufi poets whose message of universal love united vast regions along the famous trade routes from Persia to China.
  • The Lion‚Äôs Roar¬†‚Äď A contemporary and Kathak movement exploration. The Lion‚Äôs Roar is based upon ‚ÄėThe Sutra of the Lion‚Äôs Roar of Queen Srimala‚Äô, a Buddhist text written by Queen Srimala of the Kosala dynasty in the third century BC in central India.
  • Snowangels¬†‚Äď A 35-minute ensemble choreography that explores the sacred geometry of snow. It is inspired by the visual grandeur and sensuality of the snowscapes painted by Canadian Lauren Harris.

Introduction and moderation by Anna Greenspan, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Global Media, IMA.

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

When we speak of ‚ÄúEarly China,‚ÄĚ what exactly are we talking about? When most people think about China in the long ago past, what do they think of? The likely answer is the great philosophers, like Confucius and Mencius; the famous strategist, Sunzi. Perhaps we think of terra cotta warriors in Xi‚Äôan, or perhaps the philosopher, Zhuangzi, dreaming of being a butterfly. These famous markers of ‚ÄúEarly China‚ÄĚ are only pieces of a larger, less familiar story. Early China was also a time of practices like human sacrifice and oracle bone divination, of zeal for Heaven‚Äôs mandate and utopian visions such as the Great Unity. Generations of scholars have contributed to understanding this period that can seem so alien to us, and presented it to a world audience. Now Early China is not only an integrated part of the global past, often compared with Ancient Greece and the Roman empire, enrollment in Harvard‚Äôs class on Early Chinese thought has reached 700 students. What is the appeal of Early China, and how do we study it? This event invites the leading scholars of this field to talk about their own experiences in the field of Early China and how to present this vibrant scholarly field to a global audience.

Michael Nylan (Ph.D. 1983, East Asian Studies, Princeton University) is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. She began her teaching career at Bryn Mawr College, in its History Department, with a joint affiliation with the Growth and Structure of Cities program and with Political Science. There she began to learn about early political philosophy by co-teaching with Steven Salkever, an Aristotle expert. After having served as a one-woman show in East Asian History for over a decade at Bryn Mawr, in 2001 she moved on to join the UC-Berkeley History Department, to conduct research with some of the country’s best scholars of Chinese history and to supervise graduate students from around the world. Now she writes in three main academic disciplines: the history of early China (roughly 300 BC-AD 300), early Chinese philosophy, and the art and archaeology of China. As her teachers (Paul Serruys, Michael Loewe, Nathan Sivin, Herbert Fingarette, and Henry Rosemont, Jr. among them) gave her an abiding interest in the use and abuse of history, she also works in the modern period, as well as in the politics of the common good, past and present. She has won prizes for her translation and research endeavors. Currently she is completing two projects, a reconstruction of the Han-era Documents classic (jointly with Professor He Ruyue), and a project tentatively entitled The Four Fathers of History (jointly with Professor Suzanne Sa√Įd), which compares Herodotus, Thucydides, Sima Qian, and Ban Gu.

Michael Puett is the Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History at Harvard University. His interests are focused on the inter-relations between history, philosophy, anthropology, and religion, with the hope of bringing the study of China into larger historical and comparative frameworks. He is the author of The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China (Stanford University Press, 2001) and To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China (Harvard University Asia Center, 2002), as well as the co-author, with Adam Seligman, Robert Weller, and Bennett Simon, of Ritual and its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity (Oxford University Press, 2008).  

Trenton Wilson, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. Trenton is interested in early Chinese intellectual and political history, especially during the Qin, Han and Wei-Jin periods. He is currently working on a dissertation entitled, “Empire of Luck: Trust and Suspicion in China’s Early Empires, 221 BCE-317 CE.” Prior to his studies at UC Berkeley, Trenton received an M.A. in Chinese philosophy¬†at Beijing University.¬≠¬≠

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Zhao Lu, Assistant Professor of Global China Studies, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Indian Ocean Port Cities and their Hinterlands

Indian Ocean Port Cities and their Hinterlands

Venue: Room 1504, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: September 26, 2019 to September 27,2019

Overview

During the past decade there has been a considerable increase in literature documenting the growth of Indian Ocean port cities. Famously described as the Brides of Sea, port cities such as Cape Town, Shanghai, Karachi, Bombay (Mumbai), Madras (Chennai), Calcutta, Rangoon, Singapore, and Jakarta were considered the bridgeheads for the establishment of European dominance. This workshop has three significant aims. Firstly it will focus on the mobile and multifaceted connections, networks and routes of exchange that constitute the life worlds of port cities and beyond them, into their immediate hinterlands or even more distant localities. Secondly it will not only highlight the interconnected oceanic histories, networks and flows but also examine the uneasy relationships between port cities and the coast, the boundaries between land and sea, the relationship between the port and hinterland and how they were shaped by labour, infrastructure and property. Thirdly the workshop will also explore the legal, regulatory and political structures put in place to govern the port cities. This includes both the institutions and technologies of rule, policing and racial segregation of populations, as well as the different levels of political mediation, legal manoeuvring and petitioning undertaken by a cross section of society.

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#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Asia in a Global Age: A Conversation

Asia in a Global Age: A Conversation

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, May 6, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

What is “Asia”? What unites it, conceptually or otherwise? Or if nothing does, what does it mean to talk about “Asia”? This event will examine the idea of Asia from global, regional, and imaginary perspectives. The discussants discuss these perspectives from their own sub-regional fields of studies, China, Japan, South and Southeast Asia, and West Asia. They will explain the significance of understanding Asia from different vantage points and in the context of a globalized and connected world.

Sunil Amrith is Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and Professor of History at Harvard University, and Director of the Harvard Center for History and Economics. He is the author of four books, including Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (2013), and Unruly Waters: How Mountain Rivers and Monsoons Have Shaped South Asia’s History (2018). He is a 2017 MacArthur Fellow, and was awarded the 2016 Infosys Prize in Humanities.

Zachary Lockman is Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and of History at New York University. The main focus of his research has been the socioeconomic, cultural and political history of the modern Middle East, particularly the Mashriq. He has served as president of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (2007), as a member of the Joint Committee on the Near and Middle East of the Social Science Research Council/American Council of Learned Societies; and as an editor (and currently a contributing editor) of Middle East Report. His recently published books include Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States (Stanford University Press, 2016).

Karen L. Thornber is Professor of Comparative Literature and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, Victor and William Fung Director of the Harvard University Asia Center, and Chair of Harvard University Asia Center Council. She has served as Chair of Comparative Literature, Chair of Regional Studies East Asia, Director of Graduate Studies in Comparative Literature, and Director of Graduate Studies in Regional Studies East Asia at Harvard. She also directed the Harvard Global Institute Environmental Humanities and Social Sciences Initiative. She published three major scholarly monographs, six dozen articles, and multiple (co)edited volumes on a range of fields in literature and cultural history.

Introduction and moderation by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, New York University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene

Keynote Address | Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene

Patrick Manning

Venue: Room 1504, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, April 18, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The four sections of this 40-minute talk are to review Asian migration and identify issues for research. First, it traces early migrations, resettlement, and agriculture in the Pleistocene (plus early Holocene) era of climate instability, up to 2000 BCE. Second, it chronicles migrations in the late Holocene era of climate stability, the era of Asian empires and expansion of societies up to 1800 CE. Third, it addresses the return to climate instability in the Anthropocene (since 1800), a time of economic divergence, population growth, and urbanization. The concluding section emphasizes the varying effects of migration in five major Asian regions, to open discussion on the possibilities for relevant and feasible research projects.

 

Patrick Manning is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History, Emeritus, at the University of Pittsburgh, where he was Director of the World History Center (2008‚Äď2015). Manning served as president of the American Historical Association, 2016‚Äď2017. Trained as a historian of Africa, he became a specialist in world history, emphasizing migration and historical datasets. He is author of The African Diaspora: A History Through Culture (Columbia University Press, 2009), Migration in World History (Routledge, 2012; second edition), and Navigating World History: Historians Create a Global Past (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003)‚ÄĒavailable in Chinese; he is co-editor of three books on world history of science. He was supported by the Institute for Global and Transnational History, Shandong University, for 2017 research on his next book, A History of Humanity: Evolution of the Human System (forthcoming 2020).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, NYU.

* This event is co-sponsored by Global Perspectives on Society.

Share

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

The 2nd CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ

The 2nd CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium on ‚ÄúAsia and the World‚ÄĚ

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: April 18-19, 2019

– Overview

This second annual symposium brings together¬†undergraduates and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows¬†researching at NYU Shanghai, whose work examines and expands the ever-changing intellectual boundaries of academic scholarship on China, Asia and the broader world. Inaugurating this two-day event, Patrick Manning (Professor Emeritus of History, University of Pittsburgh) will deliver a special keynote address on “Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene.”¬†The research of these young scholars represents some of the newest and most dynamic directions in the fields of anthropology, art history, history, literature and film studies.

– Keynote Address

Title: “Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene“

Speaker: Patrick Manning | Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History, Emeritus, University of Pittsburgh

Date & Time: Thursday, April 18, 2019  | 17:30-19:00

Venue: Room 1504, NYU Shanghai

The four sections of this 40-minute talk are to review Asian migration and identify issues for research. First, it traces early migrations, resettlement, and agriculture in the Pleistocene (plus early Holocene) era of climate instability, up to 2000 BCE. Second, it chronicles migrations in the late Holocene era of climate stability, the era of Asian empires and expansion of societies up to 1800 CE. Third, it addresses the return to climate instability in the Anthropocene (since 1800), a time of economic divergence, population growth, and urbanization. The concluding section emphasizes the varying effects of migration in five major Asian regions, to open discussion on the possibilities for relevant and feasible research projects.

* This event is co-sponsored by Global Perspectives on Society.

Share

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
‚ÄĘ RSVP¬†may be required for this event. Please check event details
‚ÄĘ Visitors will need to present a photo ID¬†at the entrance
‚Äʬ†There is no public parking on campus
‚Äʬ†Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue)¬†
‚Äʬ†Taxi card¬†
‚Äʬ†Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B¬†
‚Äʬ†Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved