Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Venue: Room 1100, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019
Time: 12:30 - 14:00 CST

The destruction of the Cham cities of Indrapura (982) and Vijaya (1471) constituted decisive Đại Viêt victories against Champa but it was not until 1832 that the last Cham territory of Panduranga was formally incorporated by the Nguyễn dynasty into Vietnam’s territory. This article elaborates on present-day reverberations of these three significant historical events in the entangled Việt-Cham history. Rather than providing a historical interpretation of these turning-point events linked to particular dates, I offer an ethnographically informed analysis of lasting effects that these historical moments had in different localities and on various categories of people. Specifically, the article zooms in on two Cham communities spread across the South China Sea – one located in the old territory of Panduranga (Vietnam), the other – living in exile – in Hainan (China). By introducing two different but overlapping Cham mythico-histories narrated in those communities, the study shows that the absence of an actual territory of Champa incited people to take different routes in reproducing the bonds that stand for their homeland, and ultimately for their redemption. Building on Liisa Malkki’s analytical framework in her study of displacement and exile, the article argues that for Cham people in Vietnam redemption was a transcendental act of recovering lost co-ethnic communities dispersed in the region, while for those in Hainan redemption was sought in enacting Islamic piety and in a combined, palimpsestic ethnic-religious homeland that included Champa as a place of origin but embraced China as the new homeland.

Edyta Roszko is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen, Norway, where she develops a new research direction on oceans. After her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology / Martin Luther University (Halle, Germany – 2011) which focused on religion and politics in Vietnam, she did ethnographic research among Chinese and Vietnamese fishing communities in the common maritime space of the South China Sea. Bridging different historical periods and countries, the question of mobility, migration and connectivity of fishers compelled her to historicize fishing communities and to work beyond the nation-state and area studies frame. Edyta’s newly awarded European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant project TransOcean at Chr. Michelsen Institute expands her geographic field beyond Vietnam and China to include other global regions in Oceania and West and East Africa.

Edyta’s scholarly articles have appeared in Cross-Currents: East Asian history and Culture Review, Nations and Nationalism and Journal of Contemporary Ethnography and other journalsHer monograph Fishers, Monks and Cadres: Navigating State and Religious Authorities along Central Vietnam’s South China Sea Coast is forthcoming with NIAS Press (Copenhagen).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by ​Tzu-hui Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature at NYU Shanghai​.

NYU Shanghai community-only event. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP by Nov 12, 2019.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Venue: Room 503, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: November 5, 2019 to November 8, 2019
Time: 09:00 - 19:00 CST

Sponsored by the School of Art and Science, NYU Shanghai

Jointly organized by the Center for Global Asia/IMA of NYU Shanghai and Shanghai Museum

The workshop integrates cross-disciplinary dialogues with Buddhist deity/textile/Chinese calligraphy and painting restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It aims to raise the awareness of traditional conservation techniques, non-intrusive restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It also strives to deepen students’ knowledge of the physical and technical aspects of Buddhist artworks. Participants will engage in presentation, discussion and interact with the speakers, faculty members as well as conservators on site in NYU Shanghai. The workshop takes advantage of the rare opportunity to witness the practitioners and their life work for Buddhist objects from all over Asia, and learn about issues surrounding conservation, interpretation, and digital imaging.

In addition to familiarizing participants to the exhibitions and the unparalleled collection at the Shanghai Museum, the workshop will introduce them to the practices of the world-class conservation lab. Students are expected to complete readings assigned before the workshop and to complete a research project based on an object/ objects studied in Digital Heritage or Digital Conservation of Buddhist Deities course. The program is open to Institute students specializing in Asian art or Buddhist art as well as those whose projects relate closely to the Buddhist art of Asia.

  

Prof. Yabuuchi Satoshi | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Prof. Yamada Osumu | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Ms. Luo Xiyun | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Ms. Huang Ying | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Prof. Chen Wu-Wei | Assistant Arts Professor, NYU Shanghai 

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Partha Mitter

Venue: Room 310, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 28, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The lecture takes up the story of Indian artists and their encounter with global modernism. There is a serious imbalance in art history between Centre (the West) and Periphery (the Rest) that causes non-western artists to disappear under the global radar. This is a reflection of the complex discourse of western colonialism and the tendency to consider all non-western modernist art as mere adjuncts of western modernism. The three major artists that Partha Mitter will discuss – Amrita Sher-Gil, Rabindranath Tagore and Jamini Roy – showed striking originality and radical imagination. Yet they are hardly known to the West. This, Mitter argues, is not because of their intrinsic quality as such, but because they occupy a peripheral space within the history of global modernism. In this lecture, Mitter hopes to redress this imbalance that was true of all non-western modernism including China.

Partha Mitter is a writer and historian of art and culture, specialising in the reception of Indian art in the West, as well as in modernity, art and identity in India, and more recently in global modernism. He studied history at London University and did his doctorate with E. H. Gombrich (1970). He began his career as Junior Research Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge (1968-69) and Research Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge (1970-74). In 1974 he joined Sussex as a Lecturer in Indian History, retiring in 2002 as Professor in Art History.

His publications include Much Maligned Monsters: History of European Reactions to Indian Art (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1977; Chicago University Press Paperback, 1992; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2013); Art and Nationalism in Colonial India 1850-1922: Occidental Orientations (Cambridge University Press, 1994); Indian Art, Oxford Art History Series (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002); The Triumph of Modernism: India’s Artists and the Avant-Garde – 1922-1947 (Reaktion Books, London, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2007).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Duane Corpis, Area Head of Humanities & Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Asia, Humanities, The Provost’s Office, and The Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Venue: Room 808, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 21, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

Dancer and choreographer, Deepti Gupta, visits NYU Shanghai for an enlightening Kathak performance. Kathak is one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances, originated from Uttar Pradesh, India. This dance form traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient northern India, known as Kathaks, or storytellers. Deepti Gupta is visiting IMA to explore how contemporary technologies might connect with this traditional art-form. Join us in room 808 for a fascinating and visually engaging performance.

Building bridges between India and Canada, Deepti Gupta is a dancer and choreographer of the elegant Kathak style of Indian dance. A disciple of Sri Munna Lal Shukla, renowned guru of the Lucknow Gharana (lineage), she has recently been training and working under the guidance of Kathak legend Pundit Birju Maharaj.

Deepti holds an MA in Dance from York University, Toronto and is a noted scholar, teacher and choreographer both in Canada and in India. Her creative work has been recognized by many awards including a Chalmers Award, National Arts Centre commissions and a choreographic residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts.

Deepti’s choreographic work is at the cutting edge of contemporary South Asian dance and she has collaborated with a diverse range of international musicians, designers, and new media artists. Her work has been presented by Canada’s National Arts Centre, National Gallery of Canada, the Canada Dance Festival, Kalanidhi Fine Arts, Raga Mala of Canada, Banff Centre for the Arts, Tangente, Harbourfront Centre. Her work has also been presented internationally by Danspace Project & DTW, New York; Anila Sinha Foundation, International House, Chicago; Vasantotsav, Delhi; and the Panchatatva Festival Mumbai among others.

Deepti’s creations have been critically acclaimed in the New York Times, the Village Voice and Dance Connection Magazine. A relentless experimentalist with a variety of theatrical interests, she received the Dora Mavor Moore award for best costume design. She has worked extensively in Indian theatre as an actor, dramaturge and script writer. Deepti was recently a lecurer in the Aesthetics and Theory of Kathak at Kathak Kendra, National Institute of Kathak, New Delhi India.

Her recent works:

  • Silk Road Melody – The performance celebrates the great literary and philosophical legacy created by Sufi poets whose message of universal love united vast regions along the famous trade routes from Persia to China.
  • The Lion’s Roar – A contemporary and Kathak movement exploration. The Lion’s Roar is based upon ‘The Sutra of the Lion’s Roar of Queen Srimala’, a Buddhist text written by Queen Srimala of the Kosala dynasty in the third century BC in central India.
  • Snowangels – A 35-minute ensemble choreography that explores the sacred geometry of snow. It is inspired by the visual grandeur and sensuality of the snowscapes painted by Canadian Lauren Harris.

Introduction and moderation by Anna Greenspan, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Global Media, IMA.

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

When we speak of “Early China,” what exactly are we talking about? When most people think about China in the long ago past, what do they think of? The likely answer is the great philosophers, like Confucius and Mencius; the famous strategist, Sunzi. Perhaps we think of terra cotta warriors in Xi’an, or perhaps the philosopher, Zhuangzi, dreaming of being a butterfly. These famous markers of “Early China” are only pieces of a larger, less familiar story. Early China was also a time of practices like human sacrifice and oracle bone divination, of zeal for Heaven’s mandate and utopian visions such as the Great Unity. Generations of scholars have contributed to understanding this period that can seem so alien to us, and presented it to a world audience. Now Early China is not only an integrated part of the global past, often compared with Ancient Greece and the Roman empire, enrollment in Harvard’s class on Early Chinese thought has reached 700 students. What is the appeal of Early China, and how do we study it? This event invites the leading scholars of this field to talk about their own experiences in the field of Early China and how to present this vibrant scholarly field to a global audience.

Michael Nylan (Ph.D. 1983, East Asian Studies, Princeton University) is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. She began her teaching career at Bryn Mawr College, in its History Department, with a joint affiliation with the Growth and Structure of Cities program and with Political Science. There she began to learn about early political philosophy by co-teaching with Steven Salkever, an Aristotle expert. After having served as a one-woman show in East Asian History for over a decade at Bryn Mawr, in 2001 she moved on to join the UC-Berkeley History Department, to conduct research with some of the country’s best scholars of Chinese history and to supervise graduate students from around the world. Now she writes in three main academic disciplines: the history of early China (roughly 300 BC-AD 300), early Chinese philosophy, and the art and archaeology of China. As her teachers (Paul Serruys, Michael Loewe, Nathan Sivin, Herbert Fingarette, and Henry Rosemont, Jr. among them) gave her an abiding interest in the use and abuse of history, she also works in the modern period, as well as in the politics of the common good, past and present. She has won prizes for her translation and research endeavors. Currently she is completing two projects, a reconstruction of the Han-era Documents classic (jointly with Professor He Ruyue), and a project tentatively entitled The Four Fathers of History (jointly with Professor Suzanne Saïd), which compares Herodotus, Thucydides, Sima Qian, and Ban Gu.

Michael Puett is the Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History at Harvard University. His interests are focused on the inter-relations between history, philosophy, anthropology, and religion, with the hope of bringing the study of China into larger historical and comparative frameworks. He is the author of The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China (Stanford University Press, 2001) and To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China (Harvard University Asia Center, 2002), as well as the co-author, with Adam Seligman, Robert Weller, and Bennett Simon, of Ritual and its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity (Oxford University Press, 2008).  

Trenton Wilson, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. Trenton is interested in early Chinese intellectual and political history, especially during the Qin, Han and Wei-Jin periods. He is currently working on a dissertation entitled, “Empire of Luck: Trust and Suspicion in China’s Early Empires, 221 BCE-317 CE.” Prior to his studies at UC Berkeley, Trenton received an M.A. in Chinese philosophy at Beijing University.­­

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Zhao Lu, Assistant Professor of Global China Studies, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Indian Ocean Port Cities and their Hinterlands

Indian Ocean Port Cities and their Hinterlands

Venue: Room 1504, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: September 26, 2019 to September 27,2019

Overview

During the past decade there has been a considerable increase in literature documenting the growth of Indian Ocean port cities. Famously described as the Brides of Sea, port cities such as Cape Town, Shanghai, Karachi, Bombay (Mumbai), Madras (Chennai), Calcutta, Rangoon, Singapore, and Jakarta were considered the bridgeheads for the establishment of European dominance. This workshop has three significant aims. Firstly it will focus on the mobile and multifaceted connections, networks and routes of exchange that constitute the life worlds of port cities and beyond them, into their immediate hinterlands or even more distant localities. Secondly it will not only highlight the interconnected oceanic histories, networks and flows but also examine the uneasy relationships between port cities and the coast, the boundaries between land and sea, the relationship between the port and hinterland and how they were shaped by labour, infrastructure and property. Thirdly the workshop will also explore the legal, regulatory and political structures put in place to govern the port cities. This includes both the institutions and technologies of rule, policing and racial segregation of populations, as well as the different levels of political mediation, legal manoeuvring and petitioning undertaken by a cross section of society.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Asia in a Global Age: A Conversation

Asia in a Global Age: A Conversation

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, May 6, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

What is “Asia”? What unites it, conceptually or otherwise? Or if nothing does, what does it mean to talk about “Asia”? This event will examine the idea of Asia from global, regional, and imaginary perspectives. The discussants discuss these perspectives from their own sub-regional fields of studies, China, Japan, South and Southeast Asia, and West Asia. They will explain the significance of understanding Asia from different vantage points and in the context of a globalized and connected world.

Sunil Amrith is Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies and Professor of History at Harvard University, and Director of the Harvard Center for History and Economics. He is the author of four books, including Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (2013), and Unruly Waters: How Mountain Rivers and Monsoons Have Shaped South Asia’s History (2018). He is a 2017 MacArthur Fellow, and was awarded the 2016 Infosys Prize in Humanities.

Zachary Lockman is Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and of History at New York University. The main focus of his research has been the socioeconomic, cultural and political history of the modern Middle East, particularly the Mashriq. He has served as president of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (2007), as a member of the Joint Committee on the Near and Middle East of the Social Science Research Council/American Council of Learned Societies; and as an editor (and currently a contributing editor) of Middle East Report. His recently published books include Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States (Stanford University Press, 2016).

Karen L. Thornber is Professor of Comparative Literature and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, Victor and William Fung Director of the Harvard University Asia Center, and Chair of Harvard University Asia Center Council. She has served as Chair of Comparative Literature, Chair of Regional Studies East Asia, Director of Graduate Studies in Comparative Literature, and Director of Graduate Studies in Regional Studies East Asia at Harvard. She also directed the Harvard Global Institute Environmental Humanities and Social Sciences Initiative. She published three major scholarly monographs, six dozen articles, and multiple (co)edited volumes on a range of fields in literature and cultural history.

Introduction and moderation by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, New York University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene

Keynote Address | Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene

Patrick Manning

Venue: Room 1504, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, April 18, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The four sections of this 40-minute talk are to review Asian migration and identify issues for research. First, it traces early migrations, resettlement, and agriculture in the Pleistocene (plus early Holocene) era of climate instability, up to 2000 BCE. Second, it chronicles migrations in the late Holocene era of climate stability, the era of Asian empires and expansion of societies up to 1800 CE. Third, it addresses the return to climate instability in the Anthropocene (since 1800), a time of economic divergence, population growth, and urbanization. The concluding section emphasizes the varying effects of migration in five major Asian regions, to open discussion on the possibilities for relevant and feasible research projects.

 

Patrick Manning is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History, Emeritus, at the University of Pittsburgh, where he was Director of the World History Center (2008–2015). Manning served as president of the American Historical Association, 2016–2017. Trained as a historian of Africa, he became a specialist in world history, emphasizing migration and historical datasets. He is author of The African Diaspora: A History Through Culture (Columbia University Press, 2009), Migration in World History (Routledge, 2012; second edition), and Navigating World History: Historians Create a Global Past (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003)—available in Chinese; he is co-editor of three books on world history of science. He was supported by the Institute for Global and Transnational History, Shandong University, for 2017 research on his next book, A History of Humanity: Evolution of the Human System (forthcoming 2020).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, NYU.

* This event is co-sponsored by Global Perspectives on Society.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

The 2nd CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

The 2nd CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: April 18-19, 2019

– Overview

This second annual symposium brings together undergraduates and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows researching at NYU Shanghai, whose work examines and expands the ever-changing intellectual boundaries of academic scholarship on China, Asia and the broader world. Inaugurating this two-day event, Patrick Manning (Professor Emeritus of History, University of Pittsburgh) will deliver a special keynote address on “Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene.” The research of these young scholars represents some of the newest and most dynamic directions in the fields of anthropology, art history, history, literature and film studies.

– Keynote Address

Title: “Three Eras of Asian Migration: Pleistocene, Holocene, and Anthropocene“

Speaker: Patrick Manning | Andrew W. Mellon Professor of World History, Emeritus, University of Pittsburgh

Date & Time: Thursday, April 18, 2019  | 17:30-19:00

Venue: Room 1504, NYU Shanghai

The four sections of this 40-minute talk are to review Asian migration and identify issues for research. First, it traces early migrations, resettlement, and agriculture in the Pleistocene (plus early Holocene) era of climate instability, up to 2000 BCE. Second, it chronicles migrations in the late Holocene era of climate stability, the era of Asian empires and expansion of societies up to 1800 CE. Third, it addresses the return to climate instability in the Anthropocene (since 1800), a time of economic divergence, population growth, and urbanization. The concluding section emphasizes the varying effects of migration in five major Asian regions, to open discussion on the possibilities for relevant and feasible research projects.

* This event is co-sponsored by Global Perspectives on Society.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

2019 Workshop | Methods in India China Studies

2019 Workshop | Methods in India China Studies

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019

In Collaboration With

The Department of South Asian Studies, Peking University, 

Harvard-Yenching Institute,

India China Institute, New School, 

Institute of Chinese Studies, Delhi, 

Renmin University, 

The Yenching Academy, Peking University

Overview

The aim of this one-day workshop is to explore the methodological and conceptual frameworks one could use to study India-China connections and comparisons. The workshop will be divided into two sessions. The morning session will be devoted to examining the methodological frameworks employed in some of the recent publications on India-China comparisons and inter-Asian connections. The afternoon session will focus on discussing recently completed or currently ongoing doctoral research by three workshop participants. This workshop is intended to be the first in a series of capacity-building events associated with the collaborative research project entitled “China and India in the Age of Decolonization: An Analysis of the Nehru Papers, 1947-1964.” Subsequent workshops will take place in Cambridge (Massachusetts) and Delhi.

Participants

Huiyuan Bian

Huiyuan Bian is a second year PhD student at the South Asian Studies Department, Peking University, China. For her BA and MA degrees she studied Hindi language and literature. She is especially interested in Hindi women writers and the impact of their works on contemporary India. Currently, she is working on the Buddhist community in the greater Bengal region, especially around the Chattogram area. She is examining how the Buddhist community has persevered in Bangladesh, a Muslim-majority country.

Yin Cao received his PhD in history from the National University of Singapore. His research interests cover modern India, global history, and India-China relations in the twentieth century. His first book, entitled From Policemen to Revolutionaries: A Sikh Diaspora in Global Shanghai, 1885–1945, was published by Brill in 2017. His other publications can be found in journals such as the Indian Historical Review, Frontiers of History in China, Journal of Punjab Studies, and Britain and the World. Yin is currently an associate professor at the Department of History, Tsinghua University, Beijing, and is working on two research projects: one on the history of the Chinese community in Pakistan (sponsored by the All-China Federation of Returned Overseas), the other focusing on the Indian home front in China’s war against Japan in the 1940s (sponsored by the National Social Science Fund of China).

Yin Cao

Barnali Chanda

Barnali Chanda received her PhD in Comparative Literature from Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India. She is currently teaching at the Techno India University as an assistant professor of English. Her research interests include comparative literature, Chinese and Indian travelogues, literary interactions between India and China during the premodern period, and the impact of Buddhist ideas on Chinese and Sanskrit storytelling. Barnali has co-authored two books: Of Asian Lands: A View from Bengal: An Annotated Bibliography of a Century of Travel Narratives to Asian Lands in Bangla and Tellings and Retellings: Strange tales of Medieval China.

Arunabh Ghosh received his BA from Haverford and PhD from Columbia University. He is an assistant professor in the History Department at Harvard University. A historian of modern China, his interests include social and economic history, history of science and statecraft, and transnational history. Ghosh’s first book, Making it Count: Statistics and Statecraft in the Early PRC, 1949-1959, is forthcoming from Princeton University Press. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies, Osiris, BJHS-Themes, and the PRC History Review. His current projects include a history of Chinese dam-building in the twentieth century; a history of China-India scientific networks, ca. 1900-1980; and a collaborative archival project on China-related materials within the Nehru Papers.

Arunabh Ghosh

Gal Gvili

Gal Gvili is an assistant professor at the Department of East Asian Studies at McGill University. Gvili works and teaches in modern, and contemporary Chinese literature, Chinese cinema of all periods, literary and cultural theory, and South-South connections. Her current research, entitled “In Search of the National Soul: Writing Life in Chinese Literature 1918–1937” investigates how modern literature came to be perceived as effective in ushering social change during the late Qing and the Republican era through interactions between Chinese writers and Indian religions and philosophy. In an unprecedented and largely understudied episode of China’s participation in South-South cultural exchange, Chinese writers sought Indian literature and religious thought in the hopes of learning how literary expression mediates between man and universe to create a palpable change in the world. A chapter, entitled “Pan-Asian Poetics: Tagore and the Interpersonal in May 4th New Poetry” has been published in the Journal of Asian Studies. Also forthcoming is her essay entitled “China-India Myths in Xu Dishan’s Goddess of Supreme Essence.”

Miao He is a first-year graduate student at the World Economy in Research Institute for Indian Ocean Economies (RIIO), Yunnan University of Finance & Economics. Her BA degree was in Finance Engineering from the Chengdu University of Information and Technology. Her senior thesis focused on analyzing the factors influencing carbon emission pricing by means of quantitative analysis. Her current research interests include China-India relations, specifically the comparative study of Export-Import Bank in China and India. She is a member of the translation team of The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Miao He

Yuan He

Yuan He is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Residence at NYU Shanghai. She holds PhD and MPhil degrees from the Centre of Development Studies, University of Cambridge, funded by the Cambridge China Development Trust and the Malaysian Commonwealth Trust. Yuan’s research interests lie in China’s and India’s development models, human development, governance and meritocracy.  Specifically, she works to move the political economic comparison of China and India beyond the “democracy and development” trajectory by emphasizing governance structure and capacity, and broaden the academic understanding of development through re-examining the economic philosophy of human development. She has published in top International and Chinese journals, including the Journal of Contemporary China and Technology Economics (Jishu Jingji).  Her PhD thesis was entitled “Food and Shelter: Village Lives in India and China.”

Caleb Huffman is a Yenching Scholar at Peking University studying Chinese law and society. He graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa, and with College Honors in both his majors, political science and communication. Raised in a small, rural town in the United States, Caleb overcame various socioeconomic barriers to begin college at sixteen. Freshmen year of university as a Gilman Scholar, Caleb left the USA for the first time to study human migrations in Italy. After a few academic tangents resulting in three undergraduate theses covering political rhetoric and urban violence, he is back to his first interest, global migrations, and seeks to further understand the topic in the China-India context, specifically, because of the influence the bilateral relationship will have in international norms. Caleb aims to obtain an American J.D. and enter the realm of international law and diplomacy.

Caleb Huffman

Tiasangla Ikr

Tiasangla IKr is a PhD scholar at the Centre of Social Medicine & Community Health, Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is interested in studying China’s public health development and comparative study of the health sector in China and India. Her MPhil dissertation was on comparative studies of health reforms in China and India. She is a recipient of the Junior Research Fellowship of the Government of India and qualified for Assistant Professorship.  She has also worked as a research assistant in a project on “Comparative Health Systems Research: China and India” sponsored by the Indian Council of Social Science Research. She was awarded the 2017 Institute of Chinese Studies – Harvard Yenching Institute Fellowship and spent the first year of the fellowship at Central China Normal University as a senior visiting fellow of the Institute of Research for East-West Cultural Exchange. She is currently based at Fudan University’s Institute of Chinese History and Civilization. The title of her PhD thesis is “American Foundations in Public Health: Ascension of Soft Power and Free Markets in China and India.”

Zoe Jordan is a Yenching Scholar at the Yenching Academy of Peking University. She is working on her master’s degree in China Studies (International Relations) with a focus on China-South Asia security relations. She is interested in studying China-India border conflicts, nuclear nonproliferation, and Chinese media culture. Zoe is also an Editing Consultant for the Stimson Center, a D.C.-based nonpartisan policy research center, where she edits pieces for South Asian Voices. This year, Zoe is the Co-Chair of the Yenching Academy’s flagship interdisciplinary conference on China, the Yenching Global Symposium. Zoe graduated in 2018 from NYU Shanghai with a BA in Global China Studies and minors in Mandarin and Interactive Media Arts.

Zoe B. Jordan

Nishit Kumar

Nishit Kumar is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Chinese and South East Asia Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India. The title of his doctoral thesis is “China and the Nobel Prize: Reception and Impact of the Literature Prize to Mo Yan.” He was awarded the 2018 Institute of China Studies-Harvard Yenching Institute Fellowship and currently enrolled as a Senior Visiting Student at the Department of Chinese Language and Literature in Peking University, Beijing, China. He did his BA and MA degrees in Chinese language, literature and culture from the Centre for Chinese and South East Asia Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University. He completed his MPhil. from the same department. The title of his MPhil dissertation was “Evolution of Huaju (话 剧) in Modern China: A Study of Select Works, 1907 -1949.” He has also completed an one-year advance language program in Chinese from Ningbo University, China.

Ruiman Liang is a  graduate student at the Institute of World Literature at Peking University. Her research focuses on Sino-Indian cultural exchanges between the late 19th century and 1949. Her thesis examines the travelogues of Chinese visitors to India during the late Qing Dynasty.

Ruiman Liang

Adhira Mangalagiri

Adhira Mangalagiri is a lecturer in Comparative Literature at Queen Mary University of London. She received her PhD from University of Chicago. Her primary area of expertise lies in modern Chinese literature (early- and mid-twentieth centuries). Her research explores intersections between the Chinese and Indian literary spheres during the modern period. She studies China-India literary comparison both in terms of contact (the overlapping paths of texts, people, and objects across the national borders), and in terms of contingency (comparative paradigms that bring Chinese and Indian texts together in the absence of material contact).

Vivek Pisharody is a graduate student in Economics at the Yenching Academy, Peking University. Vivek studied Mathematics and Chinese at Cornell University and is interested in development economics, minorities, and Chinese politics. While studying in Kunming, Yunnan, Vivek researched the Jinuo people of southwest China and developed an interest in government policy on ethnic minorities and now studies economic and human development in rural China.

Vivek Pisharody

Jasnea Sarma

Jasnea Sarma is a PhD candidate in Asian Studies and Political Geography at the National University of Singapore(NUS). Her dissertation titled “Seeing From the Periphery: Small People, Big Resource, and the Lines in Between”  uses ethnography, oral histories and GIS cartography in several border sites between India, China and Myanmar to critically explore frontier encounters, hidden histories, spatial transformations and capitalist accumulation in sites which are both traditional border-frontiers (remote/ ethnically conflicted /refugee and humanitarian refuge zones, illicit economies, and militarization), but also evolving ‘resource frontiers’ (geo-politically and geo-economically strategic for states and capitalist extraction). In this work, she documents and narrates these transformations through ‘remote’ or unrepresented borderland voices from below, attempting to them into dialogue with critical border theories in political geography and area studies. Her dissertation critiques and furthers approaches to studying Zomia, and ‘shatter zones’ as places of refuge and escape. She has conducted long-term ethnographic fieldwork in China (Yunnan), Myanmar (Shan, Kachin) and Northeast India (Mizoram) between borders. Jasnea is part of a writing collective that explores feminist research methods in South East Asia, also collaborating with polgeonow.com for mapping projects. 

Tansen Sen is professor of History, the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai, and Global Network Professor at NYU. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Buddhism, Diplomacy, and Trade: The Realignment of Sino-Indian Relations, 600-1400 (2003; 2016) and India, China, and the World: A Connected History (2017). He has co-authored (with Victor H. Mair) Traditional China in Asian and World History (2012), edited Buddhism Across Asia: Networks of Material, Cultural and Intellectual Exchange (2014), and co-edited (with Burkhard Schnepel) Travelling Pasts: The Politics of Cultural Heritage in the Indian Ocean World (forthcoming). He is currently working on a book about Zheng He’s maritime expeditions in the early fifteenth century and co-editing (with Engseng Ho) the Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, volume 1. His latest research project concerns India-China connections during the 1950s.

Tansen Sen

Shilpa Sharma

Shilpa Sharma is a PhD candidate in the Department of East Asian Studies, Delhi University. Her research focuses on India-China connections during the Second World War. In particular, she engages with the academic and scientific networks between Colonial India and Nationalist China. She was the recipient of the Huayu Enrichment Scholarship (2014-2015). She was earlier awarded a scholarship to study at John Hopkins-Nanjing summer school (2014). She was part of an archival project to classify and catalogue materials related to modern China in the National Archives of India.  She is currently working as a research assistant on the archival project, “China and India in the Age of Decolonization: An Analysis of the Nehru Papers, 1947-1964” at the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, New Delhi.

Ping Sun (Sophie) is an assistant professor in the Department of Journalism and Communication at the Chinese Academy of Social Science. She received her PhD from the School of Journalism and Communication, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, in December 2016. Her research interests include information and communication technologies, new media and digital labour. Her focus is on how technology and algorithms generates sociotechnical and political valence in the digital economy. She was the winner of two Best Paper Awards of International Communication Conference (ICA) and Chinese Internet Research Conference(CIRC). Sophie currently a fellow of the China India Scholar-Leaders Initiative, India China Institute, The New School.

Ping Sun

Kellee S. Tsai

Kellee S. Tsai (Ph.D., Political Science, Columbia University) is Dean of Humanities and Social Science and Chair Professor of Social Science at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). She previously served as Head of the Division of Social Science at HKUST; and Vice Dean of Humanities and Social Science, and Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author or co-author of five books, including Back-Alley Banking: Private Entrepreneurs in China (Cornell 2002), Capitalism without Democracy: The Private Sector in Contemporary China (Cornell 2007), and State Capitalism, Institutional Adaptation, and the Chinese Miracle (co-edited with Barry Naughton, Cambridge 2015).  She has published articles in Business and Politics, China Journal, China Quarterly, Journal of Asian Studies, etc. Tsai’s research interests include informal finance, informal institutions, internet finance, endogenous institutional change, local development, political economy of development, private entrepreneurship, shadow banking, and migration with an area focus on China and India.

Tsui Kai Hin Brian is currently an assistant professor of History at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong. He  received his PhD from Columbia University after receiving a BA from the University of Hong Kong. Before joining PolyU, Tsui was a postdoctoral fellow at the Australian Center on China in the World,  Australian National University. A historian by training, he is interested in the intersection between revolutionary politics and mobilization of cultures on both the left and the right in China’s twentieth century. His first book, China’s Conservative Revolution: The Quest for a New Order, 1927-1949  (Cambridge University Press) studies mass politics under the Guomindang, the dilemmas confronting Chinese liberal intellectuals caught between an authoritarian state and a supposedly untamable populace, and the Nationalist Party’s appeal to Pan-Asianism as a strategy to garner international support. His current research focuses on the advent of “New China” as an Asia-wide event, zeroing in on how the advent of the People’s Republic was interpreted by Indian nationalists and Asian Christians in the early 1950s.

Brian Tsui

Krista Van Fleit

Krista Van Fleit is an associate professor of Chinese Studies at the University of South Carolina. She also directs the Chinese program and serves as the director of the Centers for Asian Studies and Islamic World Studies. Her first book, Literature the People Love, a study of the literary and cultural system in Maoist China, was published in 2013. Recently she has spent time in New Delhi and in Beijing researching her new book project, which focuses on film exchange and cultural production in China and India from the 1940s through the present. Her first article from this project, a study of the reception of Raj Kapoor and the blockbuster film Awara in China, was published in Asian Cinema in January 2014, and a book chapter, “Mao and Gandhi in the Fight Against Corruption,” which compares contemporary Chinese and Hindi cinema, was published in the Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema in November 2018.  

Jing Wang is an assistant professor at the School of Foreign Languages, Peking University. She received PhD in Indian Literature from Peking University. Her field of study includes Indian religion and culture, Indian religious literature, early modern Indian literature, Bhakti poetry in medieval India, and Indian women’s literature. She is currently taking part in several research projects, such as “The Study of Modern and Contemporary Indian Cultural Theories and Phenomena” and “Customs and Institutions: A Study of Indian Culture.” Her recent publications include “Between Humanity and Divinity: On the Origin and Evolution of Krishna’s Image in Hinduism,” “On the Liberation and Renunciation of Eros in Sūrasāgara’s Erotic Poetry,” and “Understanding Mannu Bhandari’s Narrative Strategies in Apka Bunti.”

Jing Wang

Chen Yang

Chen Yang is a first-year graduate student of modern and contemporary history at Renmin University, China. She is currently studying Indian history, especially India’s tea culture, as well as tea trade in China and India. Yang Chen majored in history as an undergraduate at the Northwest University of China.

Md Yasin did his BA and MA degrees from the Centre for Chinese and South East Asian Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU). He holds a M.Phil degree in Area Studies from the Centre for East Asian Studies, JNU (2017). Yasin received an one-year scholarship by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (India) to study in Beijing. Yasin has qualified for assistant professorship through National Eligibility Test, taught Chinese at Apeejay Stya University and Aligarh Muslim University, India, and was awarded Junior Research Fellowship by the University Grants Commission of India. He is the recipient of ICS-HYI Multi-Year Fellowship 2018 and currently studying at Central China Normal University, Wuhan, as a visiting research fellow.

Md. Yasin

Shagufta Yasmin

Shagufta Yasmin is currently an ICS-HYI Fellow (2017-2020). She is pursuing PhD degree from the Centre for East Asian Studies (CEAS), School of International Studies (SIS), Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi. She completed her BA and MA degrees in Chinese language and literature from Centre for Chinese and South East Asian Studies (CCSEAS), School of Languages, Literature and Culture Studies (SLL&CS), JNU. She was awarded the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD) Scholarship (2010-2011) by Government of India, for enhancing Chinese Language at Shenyang Normal University. She did her MPhil from CEAS, SIS, JNU, after which she taught Chinese language at Central University of Jharkhand, Ranchi. The title of her doctoral dissertation was “Chinese Environmental Diplomacy: A Study of its Environmental Cooperation with the United States of America and India, 1997-2015.”

Ke Zhang is an associate professor in the Department of History, and serves as assistant director of the Asia Research Center at Fudan University. He received his Ph.D. from Fudan University in 2009. His research interests include modern Chinese intellectual history, conceptual history and the global history of cultural exchange. He is the author of “The Conceptual History of  ‘Humanism’” in Modern China (2015, in Chinese) and the co-editor of The Production of Knowledge and the Politics of Culture in Modern China (2014, in Chinese). He is currently working on a book project on the Sino-Indian cultural relations during the late Qing period.

Ke Zhang

Jinchao Zhao

Jinchao Zhao is a PhD candidate in art and architectural history at the University of Virginia. Her dissertation focuses on the dissemination and reception of Indian stūpa worships in early medieval China. Her other research interests include the relationship between Buddhist texts and images, early medieval Chinese steles, and Persian miniature paintings in the 14th century. Prior to joining the doctoral program at UVA, she completed her MA in Comparative Literature and World Literature from Peking University.  

Jia Zhou is a doctoral candidate at the Department of South Asian Studies, School of Foreign Languages, Peking University. She majored in Urdu language and literature, and subsequently studied relations, communications and connections between India and China. Her doctoral research focuses on the  cross-cultural connections across Eurasia and interactions between China and India during the Mughal Period. She has written several essays, including “Man in the Tree — An Explore into Image in Khalidah Hussain’s Short Stories” (in Chinese) and “Research on the ‘Mi-li-kao’” that are forthcoming.

Jia Zhou

 

*Alphabetically by last name

*Not open to the public

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

International Symposium on Water Heritage in Asian Cities

International Symposium on Water Heritage in Asian Cities

Venue: Conference Hall 101, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, Shanghai, China
Date: November 29, 2018 to December 1, 2018

Keynote Address
“Controlling Water through Nature”
Dr. Maria Montoya, Dean, NYU Shanghai

 

Co-hosted by

Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences

Urban Knowledge Network Asia, International Institute for Asian Studies, Leiden University

Center for Global Asia, New York University Shanghai

Department of Cultural Heritage and Museology, Fudan University

Concept Note

Most cities in Asia are coastal delta cities or cities along major river systems or water bodies. Water has for centuries been the lifeblood of cities across Asia, present in their myths, cultures, societies and religious practices, and as a means of transportation and the backbone of local polities and economies.  But current policy discourses on water in cities—in Asia and worldwide—tend to treat water narrowly as a threat and as an element to engineer against and overcome (in the case of floods) or (in the case of scarcity) as a resource to be better managed and regulated.

What is missing in this rather unidimensional and technocratic approach to water is an appreciation of the multiple engagements between human beings and water, in historical context. This requires an understanding of, among others:

  • Water’s place as a vital part of socio-ecological systems;
  • The reciprocal relationship between water and cities, where both have shaped each other since time immemorial;
  • The reexamination of the concepts of “landscapes” and “waterscapes” to account for the many in-between spaces that are gradations of land and water rather than fully one or the other (Mathur and da Cunha, 2009)[1];
  • The many temporal dimensions of water, as an element and source of constant flux;
  • The role of rivers and other water bodies as boundaries, as connectors and dividers (Schönach, 2017)[2], as sites of coming together or contestation, as sites of memories or mental boundaries, between rich and poor, between ethnicities and nations, the sacred and the profane.

This international symposium seeks to contribute to the building of a broader, multi-disciplinary understanding of the role and functions of water in cities in Asia.  It considers water—and human engagement with it throughout history—as part of an important heritage of urban life. This heritage is worth examining in detail for its own sake, to help valorize it. But it can also serve to inform water policies in contemporary cities, by enriching concepts such as “resilience” and “adaptation”. If water is part of a socio-ecological system, its challenges and opportunities must be addressed in a multi-disciplinary fashion, connected to social, economic, political as well as ecological considerations.

The symposium is a collaboration between four institutions: Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS); the Urban Knowledge Network Asia of the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden University; New York University Shanghai; and Fudan University Department of Cultural Heritage and Museology. The event features four panels, each of which examines a different dimension of urban water heritage in Asia, in relation to ancient as well as contemporary cities. Each panel is organized by one of the organizing institutions.

The NYU Shanghai panel features multi-disciplinary scholarly work on urban water infrastructure in the region to the east of the Tai Lake. Through in-depth case studies about different aspects of the relationship between water and the city, this panel takes stock of existing analyses on the importance of urban water infrastructure in shaping the region’s past, present, and future. Together, the presentations on this panel aim to create synergy in interdisciplinary research on water in this region.

The Fudan University panel explores the diversities of water-based cultural heritage in Asian cities, with a focus of the unique histories and values of these sites in China. The histories of specific heritage sites will be examined, whose values do not only include historic, aesthetic and scientific ones, but also the social benefits in present time, such as pedagogy and local development.  

The IIAS/ Urban Knowledge Network Asia panel examines the linked histories of landscapes and waterscapes in several cities across Asia, especially in terms of their non-modern pasts. The panel will focus on the ‘drying out’ and modernization of urban spaces in the Asian context and the varied implications such policies have had on surrounding settlements, wetlands and coastal zones.  The growing vulnerability to intense urban flooding, especially in recent decades (Bangkok [2011]; Mumbai [2005]; Jakarta [2013]; Dhaka [1988]), furthermore,  urges us to reconsider the complicated relationships between land and flows in the epoch of the Anthropocene.

The Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS) panel examines waterfront redevelopment as a functional transformation of the city and its relationship with rivers and water bodies. With the evolution of key urban functions, the relationship between cities and their water bodies is also transforming. As the general trend of urban transformations involves a shift away from a singular focus on economic and transportation functions to a more broad-based focus on improvements in quality of life, waterfront redevelopment is becoming the key to the successful transformation of cities and urban water bodies. In this shift, it is not as simple as redeveloping ports and manufacturing sites into green spaces, open spaces, and places for culture or leisure activities—the heritage and cultural identity of the waterfront itself should also be acknowledged.  This panel will examine particularly Shanghai’s relationship to the Suzhou Creek and the Huangpu River, in the context of the planning of a massive 140 km long waterfront in the city.

[1] Mathur, A. and Da Cunha, D., 2009. SOAK: Mumbai in an Estuary. Rupa & Company.
[2] Schönach, P., 2017. River histories: a thematic review. Water History, 9 (3), pp. 233-257

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

How the Indian Ocean Spice Trade Made the World Modern

How the Indian Ocean Spice Trade Made the World Modern

Eric Tagliacozzo

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, October 11, 2018
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The quest for Indian Ocean spices brought the world together in ways that we only recognize now. Though spices have been in circulation since Antiquity, it really was roughly from the “Contact Age” forward (circa 1500 CE) that they began to play an absolutely vital role in connecting the world’s scattered societies. Prior to that, the Mediterranean Basin and India were thinly connected by spices; further to the east, India and Southeast Asia were too, as were Southeast Asia and China further east from that. Han Dynasty princes were found buried with cloves in their mouths two thousand years ago (and cloves only grew 5,000 kilometers away in Indonesia then). Venice built an empire on the control of spices from Asia, and Istanbul did the same after the age of the Venetians was gone. This lecture looks at these old histories as an engine for global connection. It was, after all, Indian Ocean spices that Columbus was looking for when he “found” the New World instead, so we are in some senses the result of his quest for the former, as I arrive in Shanghai from the latter. The barks and seeds of Asia ended up launching the beginnings of the imperial age, when European state-making projects under the guise of “East India Companies” eventually carved up much of the known world. We will follow this process and learn a bit about the objects of this unparalleled affection—the spices themselves—along the way. We take the pepper, seasonings, and salt on our dinner tables for granted. We shouldn’t. What could be more prosaic? Yet those and other spices are one reason we are all here together, talking about ancient voyages long ago.

Eric Tagliacozzo is Professor of History at Cornell University (USA), where he primarily teaches Southeast Asian Studies. He is the author of The Longest Journey; Southeast Asians and the Pilgrimage to Mecca (Oxford, 2013) and Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Frontier, 1865-1915 (Yale, 2005), which won the Harry Benda Prize from the Association of Asian Studies (AAS) in 2007.  He is also the editor or co-editor of nine other books: Southeast Asia and the Middle East: Islam, Movement, and the Longue Duree (Stanford, 2009); Clio/Anthropos: Exploring the Boundaries Between History and Anthropology (Stanford, 2009); The Indonesia Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke, 2009); Chinese Circulations: Capital, Commodities and Networks in Southeast Asia (Duke, 2011); Burmese Lives: Ordinary Life Stories Under the Burmese Regime (Oxford, 2014); Producing Indonesia: The State of the Field of Indonesian Studies (Cornell, 2014); Asia Inside Out: Changing Times (Harvard, 2015); Asia Inside Out: Connected Places (Harvard, 2016); and The Hajj: Pilgrimage in Islam (Cambridge, 2016).  He is the Director of the Comparative Muslim Societies Program at Cornell, the Director of the Cornell Modern Indonesia Project, and editor of the journal INDONESIA.

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

2018 Summer School | The Indian Ocean World and Eurasian Connections

2018 Summer School | The Indian Ocean World and Eurasian Connections

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: July 30, 2018 to August 12, 2018

Funded by the VolkswagenStiftung

– Overview

The landmass extending from the Mongolian grasslands to the Black Sea is usually portrayed as the conduit for Eurasian interactions and exchanges. However, even more of the links across Eurasia were initiated by sea. The Summer Schools concentrate on demonstrating that the Indian Ocean has been an integral and essential aspect of trans-Eurasian connections from the early historical period to contemporary times. These innovative and collaborative Summer Schools bring together leading scholars from various parts of the world, with multiple disciplinary backgrounds, to impart knowledge on and promote exploration in the commercial, diplomatic, religious, technological, and migratory exchanges across the Indian Ocean world that linked the far eastern regions of Asia with the heartland of Europe and many areas in between. Specific themes examined include the movement of products such as porcelain, spices, tea, and incense; the transmission of ideas, including those associated with Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity; archaeological evidence for sea travel; the contestations over and interior working of maritime hubs; the creation of and contestations over cultural heritage sites; and the use of history for contemporary geopolitical agendas. Organized as a collaborative project between the Center for Interdisciplinary Area Studies at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, and the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai, two of these Summer Schools took place in Halle (July 2016 and July 2017) and the third is held in Shanghai (August 2018). These Schools will involve participants from Germany as well as from the NYU Global Network University who will learn about the dynamics of the Indian Ocean world through rigorous analysis of texts, archaeological evidence, secondary sources, and ethnographic data. The overall aim of these Summer Schools is to stimulate an understanding of the importance of Indian Ocean “connectivities” and Eurasian exchanges in global history.

2016   Networks of Connectivities: Routes, Commodities, and the Politics of the Indian Ocean (in Halle, Germany)

2017   Connectivity in Motion: People, Ideas, and Animals across the Indian Ocean (in Halle, Germany)

2018   Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and Contemporary Connectivities of Indian Ocean History (in Shanghai, China)

After two successful Summer Schools in July 2016 and 2017, the third Summer School in 2018 will take place in Shanghai from July 30 to August 12, 2018. It will focus on the sub‐theme of “Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and Contemporary Connectivities of Indian Ocean History.” This year’s Summer School will comprise one week of lectures and one week of fieldwork in China. The lectures will examine archaeological evidence for Indian Ocean interactions, especially the shipwrecks, the importance of archival materials for the study of Indian Ocean exchanges during the colonial period, the significance of cultural heritage and museum building for decolonized states around the Indian Ocean, and the use of Indian Ocean history as part of the contemporary geopolitical agenda. During the second week, participants will undertake fieldwork at important sites in China intimately connected to Indian Ocean history: in Shanghai, Nanjing, and Quanzhou. In Shanghai, they will visit the China Maritime Museum to explore issues pertaining to the production of Chinese ceramics, the reconstruction of cultural heritage, and analyze the recent 21st Century Maritime Silk Road Initiative undertaken by the People’s Republic of China. In Nanjing, they will explore the shipyard, inscriptions, and other artifacts associated with the expeditions of the Ming‐dynasty admiral Zheng He between 1405 and 1433. In Quanzhou, participants will analyze a wide variety of archaeological sources, including the remains of a 13th‐century Chinese ship, religious monuments associated with Muslims, Hindus, Nestorians, as well as Chinese traders, the displays at the Quanzhou Maritime Museum, and interview some of the descendants of foreign traders still living in the city.

– Program (PDF)

– Lecturers

Duane Corpis | Associate Professor, Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai

Leksa Lee | Assistant Professor, Global China Studies, NYU Shanghai

Burkhard Schnepel | Professor, Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology and Center for Interdisciplinary Area Studies (ZIRS), Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg

Tansen Sen | Professor, Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai

Geoffrey Philip Wade | Senior Researcher, Australian National University

– Participants

Kathleen Michelle BurkeHumboldt University, Germany & King’s College London, UK

Hui Fang | NYU / NYU Shanghai

Federica GucciniThe University of Western Ontario, Canada

Peter Friedrich Alfons Kneitz | The Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, and at the Department of History, University Antananarivo, Madagascar

Natalie Martha KontnyUniversity of Hamburg, Germany

Anu Krishna | Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle, Germany

Elizabeth Lee | NYU

Di Luo | NYU Shanghai

Johann Nils NicolaiBerlin Institute for Comparative State Church Research, Germany

Anil Domenic ParalkarRuprecht – Karls – University Heidelberg (Heidelberg University), Germany

Mohamed SebianeSchool for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, France

Melanie Janet Sindelar