NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia Receives Second Three-Year Luce Foundation Grant

NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia Receives Second Three-Year Luce Foundation Grant

The Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai would like to announce the receipt of a second three-year (2021–2024), $450,000 grant to New York University from the Henry Luce Foundation, which will be divided equally among NYU campuses in New York, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai, in order to continue developing a research and teaching apparatus for studies of Asia as an open space of expansive mobility, connectivity, and territorial transformation. At NYU Shanghai we will use the funds to continue examining port-cities networking and coastal environments in the Indian Ocean world and start a new interdisciplinary research project on the Belt and Road Initiative. We also plan to organize summer schools in 2023 and 2024. We are grateful to the Henry Luce Foundation and the University leadership at all three campuses for their support for securing this grant.

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News ASC Blog Ke Zhang

Serial interviews on Asian Studies in China
Asia Research Center, Fudan University

Amid the rapidly increasing engagement between China and the world, when the importance of Chinese Studies have been receiving more appreciation and recognition outside China, Chinese academia has as well strived to learn more about the world, especially Asia. The discipline of Asian Studies has also witnessed some tremendous development in China.

In this series of interviews by the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai, we aim to provide insights on how Asian Studies has developed over the years in China and the current landscape of the discipline through the dialogues with some scholars who have made outstanding achievements in Asian Studies in Chinese universities.

In the first entry of this series, we interviewed Dr Zhang Ke, Associate Professor of Department of History at Fudan University, who works at the Asia Research Center, Fudan University.

1. Why did Fudan University decide to establish the Asia Research Center (ARCFD)? What is  the ARCFD’s place in Fudan’s organisational structure?  Where does the funding for the ARCFD come from?

The Asia Research Center, Fudan University was officially established in 2002, thanks to the plan of the Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies (KFAS) to set up Asian studies centers in collaboration with prominent universities in China to boost Asian Studies in and outside China. Fudan University was among the first institutions that received funding from the KFAS to set up Asian Studies centers. Fudan University has continuously provided support for the operation of the ARCFD.

The Asia Research Center, Fudan University is an independent platform for research within the university, mainly covering a variety of programmes in humanity and social science disciplines. The funding of the ARCFD mainly comes from the KFAS, and the Chey Institute for Advanced Studies (CIAS), the successor of the KFAS, after 2019. 

2. Does receiving support from the KFAS influence the focus and gravity of the ARCFD? Does the ARCFD collaborate with its Korean partners in the daily operation?

The KFAS has supported more than ten universities in China to establish Asian Studies centers. However, the KFAS does not interfere with each center’s specific operation and planning. The ARCFD has constantly maintained a good relationship with the KFAS (CIAS) and therefore has always emphasized the researches on Korean language and culture and Sino-Korean exchanges, leading to the publication and translation of many relevant academic works.

Generally, the ARCFD operates independently and regularly reports to the KFAS (CIAS) and Fudan University on its progress and expenditure.

3. How does the ARCFD operate?

The ARCFD is jointly managed by Fudan University and the KFAS (CIAS). The Principal of Fudan and the Chairman of the KFAS (CIAS) both take the role of the Chairman. The structure of the ARCFD includes bodies such as the governing board and the academic council. The Center regularly organizes meetings for planning. The daily operation is taken in the hands of the Director and the team. Every year, the ARCFD regularly sponsors Fudan scholars’ Asian Studies projects, organizes academic conferences, publishes academic works, translations and collections, and pushes collaboration with internal and external research institutions.

4. Which Asian region does the ARCFD focus on? Given the results of project grants in recent years, does the ARCFD prefer the researches on East Asia?

The ARCFD has not in principle committed to specifically focusing on any regions in Asia. Nevertheless, among the project grants in recent years, projects on East Asian studies do account for a higher portion and a bigger total number. This is in line with the general picture of Asian Studies in China. In the future, the ARCFD will put more emphasis on the balance among subjects of studies, and consider sponsoring some “neglected” projects which received little attention.

5. Does the ARCFD provide students and scholars with relevant language training?

The ARCFD prioritizes academic research with little involvement in teaching. The scholars have already possessed good language skills. The ARCFD currently does not plan to conduct language trainings.

6. Given the presence of other institutions relevant to Asian Studies in Fudan University, such as Japan Research Center, Korea Research Center and Center for Asian Economic Research, does research areas of the ARCFD intersect with these institutions’? Does the ARCFD collaborate with these institutions?

Since its establishment, the ARCFD has constantly emphasized collaboration and interaction with other institutions in Fudan, certainly including Japan Research Center, Korea Research Center, etc. The collaboration includes sponsorship of relevant research projects, joint publications of collections and translations of academic works, joint organization of academic conferences and invitation of relevant scholars to be members of academic and review committees.

7. How does the  ARCFD collaborate and interact with other Asian Studies centers in and outside China?

The ARCFD and other Asian Studies Centers in China are all members of the Asian Studies network supported by the KFAS (CIAS) and hold regular exchanges. Every year, a joint meeting of the Directors of each Asian Studies centers is held, where all the centers discuss their works and progress. The collaboration between the ARCFD and the Asia Pacific Research Institute, Peking University is the longest and closest one. The two have been regularly organizing academic forums and young scholars conferences for more than ten years.

8. Could you please briefly talk about the development of Asian Studies in China? What role has the ARCFD played in the process?

Overall, there has been a lot of progress in the field of Asian Studies in China, especially in East Asian Studies. In recent years, academia has made a leap in the studies of Southeast Asia, South Asia, Inner Asia and West Asia. Personally, I think the future direction of the field is to: first, focus on integrating the studies of all these regions to discuss interaction and communication of the substance and values within Asia; second, think about the concepts such as Asian values and Asian community with shared future as a whole to lay the foundation for reshaping Asian identity in the future. The ARCFD expects to work towards these two directions while maintaining the existing traditions to amplify the influence.

9. Has the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) brought more opportunities to the ARCFD? How does the BRI influence the operation of the ARCFD?

The BRI has indeed benefited the ARCFD and other Asian Studies centers with lots of fresh development opportunities in recent years. Focusing on the new problems emerging from the BRI, the ARCFD supports various academic conferences and research projects, some of which emphasizing theoretical researches while some focusing on practical ones. The ARCFD hopes to play its and Fudan’s strengths to make intellectual contributions to the BRI with the researches in the disciplines of humanity such as history, culture, geography and religion on the one hand, and to actively support the policy researches on international relations and development of political economy on the other.

10.

In the last two years, the Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of isolationism and nationalism in every country have generally presented great challenges to ‘Asian Studies’, and the ARCFD is no exception. The pandemic has caused lots of troubles to academic exchanges in and outside China, as a lot of interactions could only be conducted online and some projects had to be suspended. However, the changing international political landscape has instead stressed the urgency and values of rebuilding the ‘regional community’. The ARCFD hopes to strengthen the researches on the topics like ‘Intra-Asian exchanges’ and ‘Reshaping Asian values’ to excel at ‘working ahead of the times’ and pave the foundation in the face of the development and changes of the future political landscape.

11. Compared with the beginning years, how has the ARCFD developed over the years? Do you think where and how can it improve in the future?

Almost twenty years ago, when the ARCFD was just established, there lacked a shared platform for different Asian Studies disciplines in Fudan University. There was no adequate funding for research projects, academic publishing and organizing conferences as well. It was about the time when the ARCFD was set up. The Center has provided a lot of Fudan scholars, young emerging ones in particular, with precious assistance for research funds and platforms in all these years, enabling them to publish a number of works on a variety of topics. Compared with its initial years, nowadays the ARCFD has set up an extensive network among both scholars and institutions, which marks the greatest development of the Center.

In the future, the first thing to focus on is the dimension of theories and the Center’s directions. Amid the rapid changes in and outside China, there will be much more to work on how to reshape Asian values and identity, reiterate the meaning of ‘Asia’ and tell good Asian stories. The ARCFD hopes to support relevant researches in this aspect. The second is about the specific operation. The Center hopes to gradually resume the pre-pandemic operation and development in the next few years to keep working on the existing projects and expand the network of external collaboration.

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Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

ATTCAT 2021

ATTCAT 2021

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-6-11 to 2021-6-14
2021-6-18 to 2021-6-20
20:30-23:30 (Shanghai)

中國古代建築術語注釋與翻譯工作坊暨國際研討會

The International Workshop & Symposium on Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology

In Collaboration With

School of Architecture, Southeast University 東南大學建築學院

Key Scientific Research Base of Technology of Traditional Wooden Architecture (Southeast University), State Administration for Cultural Heritage, China 傳統木構建築營造技藝研究國家文物局重點科研基地 (東南大學)

Vanderbilt University 範德堡大學

Organizers

Chen Wei, Professor, Southeast University  陳薇,東南大學,中國

Tracy Miller, Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University  梅晨曦,範德堡大學,美國

Zhuge Jing, Associate Professor, Southeast University  諸葛淨,東南大學,中國

Lala Zuo, Associate Professor, NYU Shanghai  左拉拉,上海紐約大學,中國

Program Overview

中國建築是世界建築的重要部分,尤其中國古代建築,一直吸引著各國學者的關注與研究。但是,由於中國古代建築的術語較為晦澀難懂,跨語境學術討論中不可避免的術語翻譯,更增加了交流與理解的複雜性,成為學界研究中國古代建築的障礙,也不利更廣泛的人們理解中國古代建築的價值。

有鑑於此,東南大學陳薇、範德堡大學梅晨曦Tracy Miller及東南大學諸葛淨共同發起“中國傳統建築術語注釋與翻譯(The Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology,簡稱ATTCAT)”國際合作計畫,並每年舉辦工作坊與研討會,通過來自不同文化與語言背景的學者的共同研討,推進對中國古代建築術語的跨語境研究,加強對術語的共同認知。研討成果逐步通過開源數據庫(https://architecturasinica.org)與公眾分享。

本研討會已於2018年以及2019年成功舉辦了兩屆。因疫情與旅行限制,2020年的研討會被迫取消。2021年的研討會由上海紐約大學左拉拉組織,改於Zoom線上會議平臺舉行。

Chinese architecture is a critical component of global architectural heritage. Scholars of historic architecture around the world have been particularly fascinated by China’s traditional timber-frame system. However, the idiosyncratic technical terminology used to describe this system of building has long been an obstacle for scholars. Native and non-native speakers alike find it challenging to fully understand the terms and translate them into modern parlance and across cultural divides. Without a full understanding of the vocabulary used to describe Chinese architectural elements, this rich tradition remains largely inaccessible to an ever-expanding public interested in visiting, and more deeply understanding, China’s cultural heritage sites.

In the light of this, a group of scholars and architectural historians, led by Professor CHEN Wei (Southeast University, China), Professor Tracy Miller (Vanderbilt University, USA), and Professor ZHUGE Jing (Southeast University, China), initiated an international collaboration called the Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology (ATTCAT). The ATTCAT project is a workshop that meets annually and brings scholars from different countries and cultures together to study the meaning of technical terms in traditional Chinese architecture and develop full annotated translations with bibliographic references. By then publishing revised annotations in open-access databases, the ATTCAT project seeks to advance a common knowledge of Chinese architectural terminology and the heritage it describes.

The ATTCAT Workshop has been successfully hosted twice, first in 2018 and then in 2019. Although the 2020 workshop was canceled due to the pandemic, we are happy to announce that the 2021 workshop will be hosted by NYU Shanghai and organized by Professor Lala Zuo (NYU Shanghai). The event will take place over Zoom across two weekends: June 11-14; and then again from June 18-20.

Participants

Bai Ying 白穎 | Southeast University 東南大學

Benda, Yuh-Fen 許玉棻 | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Campbell, Aurelia 金田 | Boston College 波士頓學院

Chen Wei 陳薇 | Southeast University 東南大學

Harrer, Alexandra 荷雅麗 | Tsinghua University 清華大學

Jia Tingli 賈亭立 | Southeast University 東南大學

Liu Yan 劉妍 | Kunming University of Science and Technology 昆明理工大學

Miller, Tracy 梅晨曦 | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Murphy, Kevin | Vanderbilt University 范德堡大學

Ruitenbeek, Klass 魯克斯 | Asian Art Museum, Berlin 亞洲藝術博物館(柏林)

Steinhardt, Nancy 夏南悉 | University of Pennsylvania 賓夕法尼亞大學

Sun Xiaoqian 孫曉倩 | Southeast University 東南大學

Tang Cong 唐聰 | Chongqing University 重慶大學

Yan Wencheng 顏文成 | Independent Scholar 獨立學者

Yu Lina 俞莉娜 | Peking University 北京大學

Zhuge Jing 諸葛淨 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zuo Lala 左拉拉 | New York University Shanghai 上海紐約大學

Zwerger, Klaus | Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) 維也納工業大學

Student Participants

Cao Yiming 曹一鳴 | Southeast University 東南大學

Chen Baolong 陳寶龍 | New York University 紐約大學

Ding Boyi 丁伯儀 | Vienna University of Technology 維也納工業大學

Fu Shiyi 付詩怡 | Southeast University 東南大學

Guo Mian 郭勉 | Southeast University 東南大學

Hong Yun 洪雲 | Southeast University 東南大學

Jiang Jiayuan 蔣嘉元 | Southeast University 東南大學

Li Ke 李珂 | Southeast University 東南大學

Liu Shuo 劉碩 | Southeast University 東南大學

Miu Tongqian 繆彤茜 | Southeast University 東南大學

Wang Yuanyuan 王媛媛 | Southeast University 東南大學

Xie Qizhen 謝祺錚 | Southeast University 東南大學

Ye Cong 葉聰 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhang Jing 張靖 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhang Xu 張旭 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zhao Yue 趙越 | Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich (ETH) 蘇黎世聯邦理工學院

Zhao Yuqian 趙與謙 | Southeast University 東南大學

Zheng Qian 鄭倩 | Vienna University of Technology 維也納工業大學

Zhou Jun 周俊 | Southeast University 東南大學

Technical Support

For any Zoom related question, please contact the Program Associate, Baolong Chen (bc3049@nyu.edu )

Language: English, Chinese

By invitation only.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Which Global? Circulating Chinese Drama and Theatre in Europe, the Americas, and Southeast Asia

Which Global? Circulating Chinese Drama and Theatre in Europe, the Americas, and Southeast Asia

Speaker: Josh Stenberg
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-5-4 | 18:00-19:30 (Shanghai)
2021-5-4 | 6:00-7:30 (New York)
2021-5-4 | 14:00-15:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Whether from states, promoters, or observers, there is a great deal of enthusiasm about the circulation of Chinese culture abroad, not least in contemporary cultural diplomacy projects. High-flown abstractions do not always translate to attention toward either the cultural product that is travelling (e.g. a dramatic text or narrative, or a performance troupe or practice) or to the society where it arrives. This presentation considers a variety of transnational circulations, including 19th century theatre translation in France, a 1960 performance tour of Jingju (Beijing opera) to Canada, and a contemporary Chinese-origin puppetry practice in Indonesia to reconsider what these circulations actually mean, and what determines how Chinese culture is received on arrival in various socio-historical contexts.

Josh Stenberg is a Senior Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney. He worked as foreign liaison for the Jiangsu Kunqu Company from 2001 to 2004 and studied and taught in Nanjing again from 2011 to 2015. He is the author of Minority Stages: Sino-Indonesian Performance and Public Display (University of Hawai’i, 2019) and the translator or editor of several volumes of Chinese fiction in translation. 

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Recommended Reading:

How far does the sound of a Pipa carry? Broadway adaptation of a Chinese classical drama

Wayang potehi: Glove puppets in the expression of Sino-lndonesian identity

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

Speaker: Rebecca Ehrenwirth
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-27 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-27 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-4-27 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

When Sinophone-Thai authors Sima Gong and Zeng Xin were born in the 1930s in Bangkok, they were not Sinophone writers yet. They did not even learn to speak Chinese until they were children, respectively teenagers. However, nowadays they count among the most prolific and popular Sino-Thai authors despite their rather high age. So when did they become Sinophone writers in Thailand and why?

In this talk I will discuss the importance of narrative self-making and metafiction in Sinophone literature in Thailand. I will mostly focus on flash fiction and poems by the two mentioned authors to exemplify not only how Sinophone writers try to (de-)construct their identities as Sinophone, Thai and as writers in Thailand but also how they struggle with their multiple identities in every day life.

Rebecca Ehrenwirth is an Assistant Professor of Translation (Chinese-German) at the University of Applied Sciences/SDI Munich and teaches at Jilin International Studies University in Changchun. She received her Ph.D. in Sinology from Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. Her research focuses on Sinophone literature (mainly in Southeast Asia), postcolonial studies, Queer film studies, contemporary Chinese art and film, as well as creative teaching techniques. Her book on Contemporary Sinophone Literature in Thailand was published in 2018 with Harrassowitz in Germany; a journal article on Intertextuality in Sino-Thai literature has just been published in the latest issue of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. She is currently working on an article on the Shanghai Queer Film Festival and co-editing a book on Contemporary German-Chinese Cultures in Dialogue which will be published in 2023 with Springer.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-17 | 9:00-10:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-16 | 21:00-22:30 (New York)
2021-4-17 | 5:00-6:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

Venue: Room 1502-04, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai & Zoom
Date : April 16-17, 2021

– Overview

The Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World” brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYUSH to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. The Symposium is designed so that early career scholars can explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work. 

– Keynote Address

Title: Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho | Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History, Duke University. Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Date & Time: Saturday, April 17, 2021  | 9:00-10:30 AM Shanghai

Venue: Room 1502-04, NYU Shanghai & Zoom Webinar 

Abstract

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Speaker Info

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

*NYU Community Only Event

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• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Speaker: Liang Luo
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-13 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-13 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-4-13 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Paul Robeson was a renowned American concert artist and stage and film actor who sang what became the Chinese national anthem, “March of the Volunteers,” in Mandarin Chinese in New York City and Prague, among other locations, from the late 1930s onward. Joris Ivens was a Dutch documentary filmmaker who traveled to China in 1938 to film The 400 Million (1939), a documentary that depicted the Chinese resistance against Japanese invasion and publicized “March of the Volunteers” as one of its key soundtracks. This talk connects Paul Robeson and Joris Ivens through their activist roles in the making of the Chinese national anthem, in the context of their generation of the international avant-garde, and in relation to their complex and evolving relationship with modern Chinese cultural politics, from the late 1930s to the late 1950s.

Born in Chongqing, China, Professor Liang Luo received her B.A. in Chinese and M.A. in Comparative Literature from Beijing Normal University, and her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University. She is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Kentucky and the author of The Avant-Garde and the Popular in Modern China (Michigan, 2014) and The Global White Snake (Michigan, 2021). Her current book and documentary film project is titled Profound Propaganda: The International Avant-garde and Modern China.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Speaker: William A. Callahan
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-8 | 11:15-12:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-7 | 22:15-00:30 (New York)
2021-4-8 | 7:15-8:30 (Abu Dhabi)

China: The Pessoptimist Nation considers how we need to look beyond the PRC’s growing economic and military power to consider how history, culture, and identity frame China’s domestic politics and international affairs. While mainstream international relations scholars talk of a security dilemma – where one state’s military strength provokes other states’ military development in a vicious cycle – the presentation suggests that Chinese politics is shaped by an “identity dilemma”: an interplay of positive and negative feelings that shape China’s pessoptimist view of itself and the world. Rather than answering the standard social science question “what is China?” with statistics of economic and military power, the presentation asks “when, where and who is China?” to explore how China’s national security is closely linked to its nationalist insecurities. While it is common to look to history to answer political questions (e.g. the “history war” between China and Japan), this presentation argues that we need to look to politics to understand history: i.e. as textbooks and popular histories from Taiwan show, the “Century of National Humiliation” is not the only way to talk about China’s modern history and politics. The presentation considers how Xi Jinping’s discussions of the China Dream and National Rejuvenation emerge from national humiliation discourse, and what this means for China (and the world) in the 2020s.  

William A. Callahan is professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and in 2020-21 he is Taiwan Foundation for Democracy Fellow at National Taiwan University. His research examines the interplay of culture and politics, and visual global politics. Callahan’s most recent book is Sensible Politics: Visualizing International Relations (Oxford University Press, 2020). His other work includes China: The Pessoptimist Nation (OUP, 2010) and the documentary film “Great Walls” (2020), which asks why we hate Trump’s wall and love the Great Wall of China (https://sensiblepolitics.net/great-walls-journeys-from-ideology-to-experience). 

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going? A Historian’s Perspective

Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going?
A Historian’s Perspective

Speaker: Edward A. Alpers
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-26 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-26 | 9:00-10:30 (New York)
2021-3-26 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-3-26 | 14:00-15:30 (Berlin)

Co-organizer: Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

This talk offers a survey of Indian Ocean Studies, focusing primarily on the development of its historiography after World War II and its emergence as a distinct scholarly enterprise from the 1980s to the present day. In particular, it examines some of the seminal monographs that have been published over the past two decades, suggesting the characteristics and challenges of modern historiography as reflected in these works. The talk concludes by raising a number of lingering questions and suggesting ways ahead for future scholarship.

Edward A. Alpers is Research Professor (Emeritus) in the UCLA Department of History. He studied African History at Harvard College and received his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Before joining UCLA in 1968 he taught for two years at the University of Dar es Salaam; in 1980 he taught at the Somali National University as a Fulbright Senior Scholar. In 1994 he served as President of the African Studies Association (USA) (1994). His research and writing focus on international trade in Indian Ocean Africa. His major publications include Ivory and Slaves in East Central Africa (1975), East Africa and the Indian Ocean (2009), and The Indian Ocean in World History (2014); he has also co-edited Cross-Currents and Community Networks: The History of the Indian Ocean World (2007), Connectivity in Motion: Island Hubs in the Indian Ocean World (2018), and Transregional Trade and Traders: Situating Gujarat in the Indian Ocean from early times to c.1900 (2019).

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Burkhard Schnepel, Professor of Social Anthropology Acting Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Area Studies Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Speaker: Gina Marchetti
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-16 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-16 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-3-16 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Throughout its history, Hong Kong has been a transit hub serving as a point of arrival and departure for people as well as goods from around the world. These global flows hold a particular significance for women as they face unique challenges related to intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality within the Chinese diaspora. Hong Kong’s women filmmakers tell a range of stories about migration focusing on female protagonists as they navigate the various transnational networks that connect Mainland China, Hong Kong, and the rest of the world. This presentation focuses on films made by Hong Kong’s New Wave women directors, including Ann Hui, Mabel Cheung, and Clara Law, as they portray female characters located in and moving through Hong Kong from the 1980s into the twenty-first century. These prominent women directors chart the impact of Hong Kong’s change in status from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People’s Republic of China on women by drawing on various genres including the youth drama, family melodrama, and the romantic comedy.

The presentation concludes with a look at more recent developments related to women and Hong Kong history by examining Bo Wang and (Iris) Pan Lu’s Many Undulating Things (2019) in relation to COVID-19. This essay film devotes a substantial section to Hong Kong’s history of disease with specific references to the territory’s women by citing the Hollywood film Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing (Henry King, 1955). Returning to Hong Kong’s colonial past via this cinematic relationship between disease and desire, women filmmakers’ perspectives on Hong Kong, diaspora, and gender take on new meaning in our pandemic present.

Gina Marchetti teaches courses in film, gender and sexuality, critical theory and cultural studies. Her books include “Yellow Peril”: Race, Sex and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction (Berkeley: University of California, 1993), From Tian’anmen to Times Square: Transnational China and the Chinese Diaspora on Global Screens (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006), Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s INFERNAL AFFAIRS—The Trilogy (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2007), The Chinese Diaspora on American Screens: Race, Sex, and Cinema (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012), and Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema (Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi, 2018)

She has co-edited several anthologies, including Hong Kong Film, Hollywood and the New Global Cinema, with Tan See-Kam (London: Routledge, 2007); Chinese Connections: Critical Perspectives on Film, Identity and Diaspora, with Peter X Feng and Tan See-Kam (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009); Hong Kong Screenscapes: From the New Wave to the Digital Frontier, with Esther M. K. Cheung and Tan See-Kam (HKUP, 2011); and The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema, with See Kam Tan and Aaron Magnan-Park (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

Her current research interests include women filmmakers in the HKSAR, China and world cinema, and contemporary trends in Asian and Asian American film culture.

Suggested readings:

Marchetti, Gina. “Clara Law, Asia, and World Cinema,” in Aaron Han Joon Magnan-Park, Gina Marchetti, and Tan See-Kam, eds. The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema (Palgrave-Macmillan Publishers, 2018), pp.689-707.

Marchetti, Gina. “Handover Women: Hong Kong Women Filmmakers and the Intergenerational Melodrama of Infidelity,” Feminist Media Studies 16:4 (June 2016), pp. 590-609. DOI:10.1080/14680777.2016.1193292. Special Issue: “Intergenerational Feminist Media Studies: Conflicts and Connectivities”

Marchetti, Gina. “Feminism, Postfeminism, and Hong Kong Women Filmmakers,” in Esther M.K. Cheung, Gina Marchetti, and Esther C.M. Yau, eds. A Companion to Hong Kong Cinema (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2015), pp. 237-264.

Marchetti, Gina. “The Gender of GenerAsian X in Clara Law’s Migration Trilogy,” Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls: Gender in Film at the End of the Twentieth Century, ed. Murray Pomerance (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), pp. 71-87.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Weixian Pan, Assistant Professor of Interactive Media Arts, Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Speaker: Emily Wilcox
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-2-23 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-2-23 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-2-23 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this talk Professor Emily Wilcox will discuss transnational connections in modern Chinese dance history based on her recent book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy. As the first English-language history of dance in the People’s Republic of China, Revolutionary Bodies examines previously unexamined dance films, a wide range of Chinese-language published and archival materials, and ethnographic field research to analyze the work of major Chinese choreographers from 1935 to 2015. With a focus on transnational connections in this history, Wilcox challenges the previously held view that Soviet ballet was the primary force shaping China’s socialist dance creation, instead showing the impact of a broader range of intercultural connections, from Trinidad and London to North Korea and Uzbekistan. Wilcox also shows the important role that ethnic minority and diaspora artists played in twentieth-century Chinese dance history and demonstrates continuities and changes from the early socialist period to new choreography that has emerged in the past two decades. A central argument of the book is that transnational socialist dance experiments laid the basis for the art form today known around the world as “Chinese Dance.”

Emily Wilcox is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at William & Mary and an Affiliate of the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan. Wilcox is a leading scholar of Chinese dance and performance, with broader interests in twentieth-century global history, transnationalism, and social movements. Wilcox’s first book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy (University of California Press in 2018) won the 2019 de la Torre Bueno Prize© from the Dance Studies Association. Wilcox is the co-editor with Katherine Mezur of Corporeal Politics: Dancing East Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2020) and co-creator with Liangyu Fu of the Pioneers of Chinese Dance digital photograph archive, published in 2016 by the University of Michigan Asia Library. Wilcox has published more than twenty journal articles and book chapters, in English and Chinese, in leading venues in Asian studies and dance and performance studies. Wilcox taught at the University of Michigan from 2013 to 2020, where she served most recently as Associate Professor, Associate Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.

Introduction and moderation by Siye Tao, Assistant Arts Professor of Dance, NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Islam in Asia after the Mongols: Historiography and Law

Islam in Asia after the Mongols: Historiography and Law

Speaker: Guy Burak
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-12-10 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2020-12-10 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2020-12-10 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

The talk will examine the historiographical framework of the “post-Mongol period” in the broader context of the study of the Islamic tradition in west Asia. In particular, I will reflect on the dialectics between two historiographical (and political) trends: one emphasizes the rupture caused by the Mongol invasions of the thirteenth century, while the other stresses continuity between the pre- and the post-Mongol periods. As I will show, much of the debate is about how to evaluate and define change within the Islamic tradition. I will illustrate the dynamics between the historiographical approaches by concentrating on Islamic law and political thought. 

Guy Burak is the Librarian for Middle Eastern, Islamic and Jewish Studies at NYU’s Elmer Holmes Library. He is the author of The Second Formation of Islamic Law: The Hanafi School in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2015). He has published articles on the legal, intellectual and visual histories of the post-Mongol period. He is currently working on a monograph on the history of dynastic law (qanun/kanun).

Introduction by Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Professor of History and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at New York University.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Sex Work, Media Networks, and Transpacific Histories of Affect