New York Global Asia Colloquium Pandemic in the Gulf

New York Global Asia Colloquium
Pandemic in the Gulf

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
October 23, 9:00 - 10:30 AM (New York)
October 24, 5:00 - 6:30 PM (Abu Dhabi)
October 24, 9:00 - 10:30 PM (Shanghai)

Global Asia Colloquium
Fall 2020
COME ONE AND COME ALL !!!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23:
Indian Immigration, Labor, and COVID-19 in the Gulf.

Research presentations on the experiences of middle class Indians in the UAE and Qatar, by Neha Vora (Lafayette College) and on Indian laborers in the UAE, by Andrea Wright (William and Mary), with discussant, Dina Siddiqi (NYU), introduced by David Ludden (NYUNY and NYUAD).

The global pandemic has intensified inequalities globally. In the Arabian Peninsula, the coronavirus pandemic has taken a particularly heavy toll on immigrant populations. In the case of immigrants who work as manual laborers and live in dormitory housing, the pandemic has heightened their concerns over unemployment, deportation, and infection. Middle-class immigrants, too, contend with rising unemployment and many have chosen to return to India. In addition, xenophobia is on the rise in Gulf countries as all residents are living in a state of heightened insecurity. In this discussion, Andrea Wright and Neha Vora will explore how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted Indian diasporic communities, their employment, and their everyday lives in the Gulf. We will introduce audience members to our research among different Indian immigrant populations and explore how our interlocutors are affected by state and local responses to the pandemic.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Viewing Mocha from Sea, Air, and Land

Viewing Mocha from Sea, Air, and Land

Speaker: Nancy Um, Binghamton University
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
October 24, 9:00 - 10:30 AM (Shanghai)
October 23, 9:00 - 10:30 PM (New York)
October 24, 5:00 - 6:30 AM (Abu Dhabi)

In the seventeenth century, port city vistas emerged as popular imagery that frequently accompanied maritime travelogues and merchant narratives, proliferated actively by Dutch presses. While the texts of these books have been scrutinized, their accompanying images require closer examination. In this talk, I will take up several views of the port city of Mocha, on the Red Sea coast of Yemen, from that era. They include iconic printed images which originated in the Netherlands, but also an Indian painting workshop. These varied representations will be treated in conversation with each other and explored through the complicated relationships that they sustained between port city spaces, travel narratives, and image genres in the seventeenth century, a time when Red Sea and Indian Ocean travel, for both trade and pilgrimage, generated considerable visual interest.

Nancy Um is professor of art history at Binghamton University. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Her first book, The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009), relies upon a cross-section of visual, architectural, and textual sources to present the early modern coastal city of Mocha as a space that was nested within wider world networks, structured to communicate with far-flung ports and cities across a vast matrix of exchange. Her second book, Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Order of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), explores the material practices and informal social protocols that undergirded the overseas trade in 18th C Yemen.

Um’s articles have appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, African Arts, Northeast African Studies, Journal of Early Modern History, Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture, Art History, and Getty Research Journal. She has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Getty Foundation, and the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Book Launch | China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet

Book Launch | China Goes Green:
Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2020
Time: 19:00 - 20:30 Shanghai

Book Abstract

What does it mean for the future of the planet when one of the world’s most durable authoritarian governance systems pursues “ecological civilization”? Despite its staggering pollution and colossal appetite for resources, China exemplifies a model of state-led environmentalism which concentrates decisive political, economic, and epistemic power under centralized leadership. On the face of it, China seems to embody hope for a radical new approach to environmental governance.

In this thought-provoking bookYifei Li and Judith Shapiro probe the concrete mechanisms of China’s coercive environmentalism to show how “going green” helps the state to further other agendas such as citizen surveillance and geopolitical influence. Through top-down initiatives, regulations, and campaigns to mitigate pollution and environmental degradation, the Chinese authorities also promote control over the behavior of individuals and enterprises, pacification of borderlands, and expansion of Chinese power and influence along the Belt and Road and even into the global commons. Given the limited time that remains to mitigate climate change and protect millions of species from extinction, we need to consider whether a green authoritarianism can show us the way. This book explores both its promises and risks.

Yifei Li is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at NYU Shanghai and Global Network Assistant Professor at NYU. In the 2020-2021 academic year, he is also Residential Fellow at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich. His research concerns both the macro-level implications of Chinese environmental governance for state-society relations, marginalized populations, and global ecological sustainability, as well as the micro-level bureaucratic processes of China’s state interventions into the environmental realm. He has received research support from the United States National Science Foundation, the University of Chicago Center in Beijing, and the China Times Cultural Foundation, among other extramural sources. He is coauthor (with Judith Shapiro) of China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet. His recent work appears in Current SociologyInternational Journal of Urban and Regional ResearchEnvironmental SociologyJournal of Environmental Management, and other scholarly outlets. He received his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Bachelor’s from Fudan University.

Judith Shapiro is the director of the Masters in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development for the School of International Service at American University. She was one of the first Americans to live in China after U.S.-China relations were normalized in 1979, and taught English at the Hunan Teachers’ College in Changsha, China. She has also taught at Villanova, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Aveiro (Portugal) and the Southwest Agricultural University in Chongqing, China. She is a visiting professor at Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University. Professor Shapiro’s research and teaching focus on global environmental politics and policy, the environmental politics of Asia, and Chinese politics under Mao. She is the author, co-author or editor of nine books, including China Goes Green: Coercive Environmentalism for a Troubled Planet (Polity 2020), China’s Environmental Challenges (Polity 2016), Mao’s War against Nature (Cambridge University Press 2001), Son of the Revolution (with Liang Heng, Knopf 1983), After the Nightmare (with Liang Heng, Knopf 1987), Cold Winds, Warm Winds: Intellectual Life in China Today (with Liang Heng, Wesleyan University Press 1987), Debates on the Future of Communism (co-edited with Vladimir Tismaneanu, Palgrave 1991), and, together with her mother Joan Hatch Lennox, Lifechanges: How Women Can Make Courageous Choices (Random House, 1991). Dr. Shapiro earned her Ph.D. from American University’s School of International Service. She holds an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley and another M.A. in Comparative Literature from the University of Illinois, Urbana. Her B.A. from Princeton University is in Anthropology and East Asian Studies. 

Introduction by Maria Montoya, Dean of Arts and Science, Global Network Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai Associate Professor of History, NYU.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

The Borders of Chinese Architecture

The Borders of Chinese Architecture

Nancy S. Steinhardt

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, December 11, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

Chinese architecture stands across Eurasia, not only in China, Korea, Japan, and Mongolia, but much farther West. This lecture focuses on a tomb structure found from Gansu to Korea, paintings of Chinese buildings in tombs built for non-Chinese occupants, and a few decorative motifs in murals and textiles across Asia to explore why the Chinese building is used for so long and across such great distances.

Nancy S. Steinhardt is Professor of East Asian Art and Curator of Chinese Art at the University of Pennsylvania. She is author or co-author of Chinese Traditional Architecture (1984), Chinese Imperial City Planning (1990), Liao Architecture (1997), Chinese Architecture (2003), Chinese Architecture and the Beaux-Arts (2011), Chinese Architecture in an Age of Turmoil, 200-600 (2014), China’s Early Mosques (2015), Traditional Chinese Architecture: Twelve Lectures (2017), and Chinese Architecture: A History (2019) and more than 100 scholarly articles or essays. Steinhardt is a recipient of grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, Institute for Advanced Study, National Endowment for the Humanities, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, American Council of Learned Societies, Getty Foundation, Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, Social Science Research Council, American Philosophical Society, Graham Foundation for Advanced Study in the Fine Arts, Max Van Berchem Foundation, and Metropolitan Center for Far Eastern Art.  In 2019 she received the Distinguished Teacher of Art History from the College Art Association and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph. D. Teaching and Mentorship from the University of Pennsylvania. She does fieldwork in China, Korea, Japan, and Mongolia. 

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost and Affiliated Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Julius Silver Professor of History, New York University.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

A Sino-Jewish Encounter, A Humanitarian Fantasy

A Sino-Jewish Encounter, A Humanitarian Fantasy

Haiyan Lee

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, November 25, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, tens of thousands of European Jews fleeing Nazi genocide found a temporary safe-haven in Shanghai. They were able to do so crucially because Shanghai was an open city under divided governance and because China was at war with Japan and could not exercise sovereign control over its borders. In this talk, the speaker ponders the moral lessons from this fortuitous episode of humanitarianism through the lens of moral philosophy and moral psychology. Using the Canadian-Chinese writer Bella’s novel A Cursed Piano as my textual anchor, the speaker argues that fiction, even if counterfactual, is an aid to the affective, imaginative, and reflexive exercise of moral reasoning. It is thus critical in helping us overcome what Zygmunt Bauman calls “adiaphorization,” or the abeyance of individual moral agency, that pervades the modern condition.

Haiyan Lee is a professor of Chinese and comparative literature at Stanford University. She is the author of Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950 (Stanford University Press, 2007), winner of the 2009 Joseph Levenson Prize from the Association for Asian Studies, and The Stranger and the Chinese Moral Imagination (Stanford University Press, 2014). 

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Tansen Sen, Area Head of Global China Studies, Director of the Center for Global Asia, and Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

“Dead Money” and “Live money”: Entrepreneurial Aspiration in Contemporary China

"Dead Money" and "Live money": Entrepreneurial Aspiration in Contemporary China

Xiao He

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Tuesday, November 19, 2019
Time: 17:00 - 18:30 CST

Xiao He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork with rural-to-urban migrant entrepreneurs in Shanghai since 2010. This presentation examines how they distinguish between “dead money” and “live money” in their daily social organization of labour and work. With this distinction, they create the possibility of actualizing entrepreneurial aspiration. We often attribute the embrace of entrepreneurial aspiration to the pathological effects of neoliberal capitalism and state power—but is this enough?

Xiao He is a postdoctoral researcher in Development Institute at Fudan University, Shanghai. In 2017 he completed his Ph.D. in Anthropology at Utrecht University/Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity. His dissertation is titled Entrepreneurial Aspiration: Money and Social Life among Rural Migrants in Shanghai. His research areas are economical anthropology, migration, money and entrepreneurship.  

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Leksa Lee, Clinical Assistant Professor of Global China Studies and Anthropology, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Peak Dam? Towards a History of Dam-building in Twentieth Century China

Peak Dam? Towards a History of Dam-building in Twentieth Century China

Arunabh Ghosh

Venue: Room 101, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Wednesday, November 13, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

Sun Yat-sen was perhaps the first modern Chinese leader to wax rhapsodic about water. In a June 1894 letter to the official Li Hongzhang, he had celebrated its possibilities, observing that, unlike coal, it was an inexhaustible source of electricity. It would take another two decades for China’s first hydro-electric dam to appear. Built with German expertise and machinery, the Shilongba—Stone Dragon Dam—came online in the first year of the new Republic (1912), powering the street lights of nearby Kunming. In the one hundred years since, China has become the world’s leader in dam building: there are an estimated 90,000 dams in China today. This exploratory talk will offer a discussion of how we might quantify China’s dam building over the past one hundred years and situate it within a larger global history. It will operate on two levels: one of relative abstraction where the speaker will begin a preliminary assessment of macro trends and broader conceptual questions surrounding the history dam building (in China); and a second, which provides some snippets from the speaker’s ongoing archival work, focusing on two periods (the late Qing and the 1950s).

Arunabh Ghosh (BA Haverford, PhD Columbia) is an associate professor in the History Department at Harvard University. A historian of modern China, his interests include social and economic history, history of science and statecraft, and transnational history. Ghosh’s first book, Making it Count: Statistics and Statecraft in the Early PRC, is forthcoming from Princeton University Press (March 2020). Articles have appeared in the Journal of Asian StudiesOsirisBJHS-ThemesEASTS and the PRC History Review. His current projects include: a history of Chinese dam-building in the twentieth century; a history of China-India scientific networks, ca. 1900-1980; and a collaborative archival project on the China-related materials within the Nehru Papers.    

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Duane Corpis, Area Head of Humanities & Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Re-enacting an imagined lost homeland of Champa: Migration, Pilgrimage and Ritual in the South China Sea

Venue: Room 1100, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019
Time: 12:30 - 14:00 CST

The destruction of the Cham cities of Indrapura (982) and Vijaya (1471) constituted decisive Đại Viêt victories against Champa but it was not until 1832 that the last Cham territory of Panduranga was formally incorporated by the Nguyễn dynasty into Vietnam’s territory. This article elaborates on present-day reverberations of these three significant historical events in the entangled Việt-Cham history. Rather than providing a historical interpretation of these turning-point events linked to particular dates, I offer an ethnographically informed analysis of lasting effects that these historical moments had in different localities and on various categories of people. Specifically, the article zooms in on two Cham communities spread across the South China Sea – one located in the old territory of Panduranga (Vietnam), the other – living in exile – in Hainan (China). By introducing two different but overlapping Cham mythico-histories narrated in those communities, the study shows that the absence of an actual territory of Champa incited people to take different routes in reproducing the bonds that stand for their homeland, and ultimately for their redemption. Building on Liisa Malkki’s analytical framework in her study of displacement and exile, the article argues that for Cham people in Vietnam redemption was a transcendental act of recovering lost co-ethnic communities dispersed in the region, while for those in Hainan redemption was sought in enacting Islamic piety and in a combined, palimpsestic ethnic-religious homeland that included Champa as a place of origin but embraced China as the new homeland.

Edyta Roszko is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen, Norway, where she develops a new research direction on oceans. After her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology / Martin Luther University (Halle, Germany – 2011) which focused on religion and politics in Vietnam, she did ethnographic research among Chinese and Vietnamese fishing communities in the common maritime space of the South China Sea. Bridging different historical periods and countries, the question of mobility, migration and connectivity of fishers compelled her to historicize fishing communities and to work beyond the nation-state and area studies frame. Edyta’s newly awarded European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant project TransOcean at Chr. Michelsen Institute expands her geographic field beyond Vietnam and China to include other global regions in Oceania and West and East Africa.

Edyta’s scholarly articles have appeared in Cross-Currents: East Asian history and Culture Review, Nations and Nationalism and Journal of Contemporary Ethnography and other journalsHer monograph Fishers, Monks and Cadres: Navigating State and Religious Authorities along Central Vietnam’s South China Sea Coast is forthcoming with NIAS Press (Copenhagen).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by ​Tzu-hui Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature at NYU Shanghai​.

NYU Shanghai community-only event. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP by Nov 12, 2019.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Workshop | Resonance of Wisdom: Buddhist Deities Restoration and Digital Heritage Imaging

Venue: Room 503, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: November 5, 2019 to November 8, 2019
Time: 09:00 - 19:00 CST

Sponsored by the School of Art and Science, NYU Shanghai

Jointly organized by the Center for Global Asia/IMA of NYU Shanghai and Shanghai Museum

The workshop integrates cross-disciplinary dialogues with Buddhist deity/textile/Chinese calligraphy and painting restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It aims to raise the awareness of traditional conservation techniques, non-intrusive restoration, and digital heritage imaging. It also strives to deepen students’ knowledge of the physical and technical aspects of Buddhist artworks. Participants will engage in presentation, discussion and interact with the speakers, faculty members as well as conservators on site in NYU Shanghai. The workshop takes advantage of the rare opportunity to witness the practitioners and their life work for Buddhist objects from all over Asia, and learn about issues surrounding conservation, interpretation, and digital imaging.

In addition to familiarizing participants to the exhibitions and the unparalleled collection at the Shanghai Museum, the workshop will introduce them to the practices of the world-class conservation lab. Students are expected to complete readings assigned before the workshop and to complete a research project based on an object/ objects studied in Digital Heritage or Digital Conservation of Buddhist Deities course. The program is open to Institute students specializing in Asian art or Buddhist art as well as those whose projects relate closely to the Buddhist art of Asia.

  

Prof. Yabuuchi Satoshi | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Prof. Yamada Osumu | Deity Conservation Studies, Tokyo University of Arts

Ms. Luo Xiyun | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Ms. Huang Ying | Conservation Department, Shanghai Museum

Prof. Chen Wu-Wei | Assistant Arts Professor, NYU Shanghai 

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Global Modernism and Indian Avant-garde Artists (1922-1947)

Partha Mitter

Venue: Room 310, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 28, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

The lecture takes up the story of Indian artists and their encounter with global modernism. There is a serious imbalance in art history between Centre (the West) and Periphery (the Rest) that causes non-western artists to disappear under the global radar. This is a reflection of the complex discourse of western colonialism and the tendency to consider all non-western modernist art as mere adjuncts of western modernism. The three major artists that Partha Mitter will discuss – Amrita Sher-Gil, Rabindranath Tagore and Jamini Roy – showed striking originality and radical imagination. Yet they are hardly known to the West. This, Mitter argues, is not because of their intrinsic quality as such, but because they occupy a peripheral space within the history of global modernism. In this lecture, Mitter hopes to redress this imbalance that was true of all non-western modernism including China.

Partha Mitter is a writer and historian of art and culture, specialising in the reception of Indian art in the West, as well as in modernity, art and identity in India, and more recently in global modernism. He studied history at London University and did his doctorate with E. H. Gombrich (1970). He began his career as Junior Research Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge (1968-69) and Research Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge (1970-74). In 1974 he joined Sussex as a Lecturer in Indian History, retiring in 2002 as Professor in Art History.

His publications include Much Maligned Monsters: History of European Reactions to Indian Art (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1977; Chicago University Press Paperback, 1992; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2013); Art and Nationalism in Colonial India 1850-1922: Occidental Orientations (Cambridge University Press, 1994); Indian Art, Oxford Art History Series (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002); The Triumph of Modernism: India’s Artists and the Avant-Garde – 1922-1947 (Reaktion Books, London, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2007).

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Duane Corpis, Area Head of Humanities & Associate Professor of History, NYU Shanghai.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Asia, Humanities, The Provost’s Office, and The Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Here Be Dragons: Surveying the Sacred, Shanzhai, and Simulated Spaces of Chinese Burning Man

Here Be Dragons: Surveying the Sacred, Shanzhai, and Simulated Spaces of Chinese Burning Man

Ian Rowen

Venue: Room 101, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Tuesday, October 29, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

This talk examines the interpretation and appropriation of Burning Man, a transformational event culture and globalizing social movement, from its American origins to its hybridizing expressions in China. Based on years of action research within Burning Man’s global network—including in Black Rock City (Burning Man’s annual week-long urban agglomeration in the Nevada desert, with 80,000 participants) and Dragon Burn (China’s official regional event in Zhejiang Province, with 800 participants), as well as accounts of several ambitious recent ‘shanzhai’ (copycat) efforts in Inner Mongolia, the talk will trace the role of capital—financial, social, symbolic, and otherwise—in mediating Burning Man’s discursive and material circulations in China.

This account of Burning Man’s Chinese articulation by grassroots Chinese and international participants, authorized by the San Francisco-based non-profit organization Burning Man Project, as well as attempts at appropriation by China’s state-backed culture industry, including for-profit businesses supported by the Ministry of Culture, China Merchants Group, and China Capital Group, provides a colorful counterpoint to popular narratives of the US-China trade war and debates about the propriety, provenance, and influence of Chinese industry.

The talk will further consider the cultural economy of China’s industrial sectors in light of Burning Man’s purported function, per Stanford scholar Fred Turner, as ‘cultural infrastructure for Silicon Valley’, following its initial years as an outsider counter-cultural ritual. China, despite its increasingly powerful art and technology industries, has no autochthonous event culture with similar functional role or iconic status, allowing a strategic opening for a variety of actors with contending agendas. This demonstrates not only the increasingly uneasy imbrication of Chinese and American industry and cultural economy, but the diversity, tension, and creativity of contemporary Chinese society.

Ian Rowen is Assistant Professor of Sociology, Geography and Urban Planning in the School of Social Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he holds cross-appointments in the School of Art, Design, and Media, and the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. His work on culture, politics, and place-making has appeared in The Journal of Asian StudiesAnnals of the American Association of GeographersAnnals of Tourism ResearchAsian Anthropologythe BBC Chinese, and The Guardian, among other outlets. Complementing his academic endeavors, Ian currently serves as International Meta-Regional Representative for the Burning Man Project. In these capacities, he has designed interactive art pieces, founded events, connected communities, and continues to serve in an advisory role to Project founders, directors and staff.

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Christina Jenq, Assistant Professor of Practice in Economics, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

To schedule a meeting with the speaker, please email CGA (shanghai.cga@nyu.edu).
Time available (First come first serve):
Oct 29 2pm-4pm
Oct 30 10am-12pm (noon)

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Dance Performance | Kathak Performance

Venue: Room 808, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 21, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

Dancer and choreographer, Deepti Gupta, visits NYU Shanghai for an enlightening Kathak performance. Kathak is one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances, originated from Uttar Pradesh, India. This dance form traces its origins to the nomadic bards of ancient northern India, known as Kathaks, or storytellers. Deepti Gupta is visiting IMA to explore how contemporary technologies might connect with this traditional art-form. Join us in room 808 for a fascinating and visually engaging performance.

Building bridges between India and Canada, Deepti Gupta is a dancer and choreographer of the elegant Kathak style of Indian dance. A disciple of Sri Munna Lal Shukla, renowned guru of the Lucknow Gharana (lineage), she has recently been training and working under the guidance of Kathak legend Pundit Birju Maharaj.

Deepti holds an MA in Dance from York University, Toronto and is a noted scholar, teacher and choreographer both in Canada and in India. Her creative work has been recognized by many awards including a Chalmers Award, National Arts Centre commissions and a choreographic residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts.

Deepti’s choreographic work is at the cutting edge of contemporary South Asian dance and she has collaborated with a diverse range of international musicians, designers, and new media artists. Her work has been presented by Canada’s National Arts Centre, National Gallery of Canada, the Canada Dance Festival, Kalanidhi Fine Arts, Raga Mala of Canada, Banff Centre for the Arts, Tangente, Harbourfront Centre. Her work has also been presented internationally by Danspace Project & DTW, New York; Anila Sinha Foundation, International House, Chicago; Vasantotsav, Delhi; and the Panchatatva Festival Mumbai among others.

Deepti’s creations have been critically acclaimed in the New York Times, the Village Voice and Dance Connection Magazine. A relentless experimentalist with a variety of theatrical interests, she received the Dora Mavor Moore award for best costume design. She has worked extensively in Indian theatre as an actor, dramaturge and script writer. Deepti was recently a lecurer in the Aesthetics and Theory of Kathak at Kathak Kendra, National Institute of Kathak, New Delhi India.

Her recent works:

  • Silk Road Melody – The performance celebrates the great literary and philosophical legacy created by Sufi poets whose message of universal love united vast regions along the famous trade routes from Persia to China.
  • The Lion’s Roar – A contemporary and Kathak movement exploration. The Lion’s Roar is based upon ‘The Sutra of the Lion’s Roar of Queen Srimala’, a Buddhist text written by Queen Srimala of the Kosala dynasty in the third century BC in central India.
  • Snowangels – A 35-minute ensemble choreography that explores the sacred geometry of snow. It is inspired by the visual grandeur and sensuality of the snowscapes painted by Canadian Lauren Harris.

Introduction and moderation by Anna Greenspan, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Global Media, IMA.

NYU Shanghai community-only event.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Events for Fall 2019

Events for Fall 2019

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for these events. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Comparing the Past: Early China and the World

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:00 CST

When we speak of “Early China,” what exactly are we talking about? When most people think about China in the long ago past, what do they think of? The likely answer is the great philosophers, like Confucius and Mencius; the famous strategist, Sunzi. Perhaps we think of terra cotta warriors in Xi’an, or perhaps the philosopher, Zhuangzi, dreaming of being a butterfly. These famous markers of “Early China” are only pieces of a larger, less familiar story. Early China was also a time of practices like human sacrifice and oracle bone divination, of zeal for Heaven’s mandate and utopian visions such as the Great Unity. Generations of scholars have contributed to understanding this period that can seem so alien to us, and presented it to a world audience. Now Early China is not only an integrated part of the global past, often compared with Ancient Greece and the Roman empire, enrollment in Harvard’s class on Early Chinese thought has reached 700 students. What is the appeal of Early China, and how do we study it? This event invites the leading scholars of this field to talk about their own experiences in the field of Early China and how to present this vibrant scholarly field to a global audience.

Michael Nylan (Ph.D. 1983, East Asian Studies, Princeton University) is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. She began her teaching career at Bryn Mawr College, in its History Department, with a joint affiliation with the Growth and Structure of Cities program and with Political Science. There she began to learn about early political philosophy by co-teaching with Steven Salkever, an Aristotle expert. After having served as a one-woman show in East Asian History for over a decade at Bryn Mawr, in 2001 she moved on to join the UC-Berkeley History Department, to conduct research with some of the country’s best scholars of Chinese history and to supervise graduate students from around the world. Now she writes in three main academic disciplines: the history of early China (roughly 300 BC-AD 300), early Chinese philosophy, and the art and archaeology of China. As her teachers (Paul Serruys, Michael Loewe, Nathan Sivin, Herbert Fingarette, and Henry Rosemont, Jr. among them) gave her an abiding interest in the use and abuse of history, she also works in the modern period, as well as in the politics of the common good, past and present. She has won prizes for her translation and research endeavors. Currently she is completing two projects, a reconstruction of the Han-era Documents classic (jointly with Professor He Ruyue), and a project tentatively entitled The Four Fathers of History (jointly with Professor Suzanne Saïd), which compares Herodotus, Thucydides, Sima Qian, and Ban Gu.

Michael Puett is the Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History at Harvard University. His interests are focused on the inter-relations between history, philosophy, anthropology, and religion, with the hope of bringing the study of China into larger historical and comparative frameworks. He is the author of The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China (Stanford University Press, 2001) and To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China (Harvard University Asia Center, 2002), as well as the co-author, with Adam Seligman, Robert Weller, and Bennett Simon, of Ritual and its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity (Oxford University Press, 2008).  

Trenton Wilson, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley. Trenton is interested in early Chinese intellectual and political history, especially during the Qin, Han and Wei-Jin periods. He is currently working on a dissertation entitled, “Empire of Luck: Trust and Suspicion in China’s Early Empires, 221 BCE-317 CE.” Prior to his studies at UC Berkeley, Trenton received an M.A. in Chinese philosophy at Beijing University.­­

Introduction and moderation of the Q&A by Zhao Lu, Assistant Professor of Global China Studies, NYU Shanghai.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for Global Asia and the Global China Studies Program, NYU Shanghai.

Share

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2020 All Rights Reserved

Nationalism, Media, and Gender in East Asia

Nationalism, Media, and Gender in East Asia

Mayfair Yang

Venue: Room 1505, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai
Date: Monday, October 7, 2019
Time: 17:45 - 19:15 CST

The language and visuality of nationalism and social identity are often constructed through gendered performances of the body. This talk examines the gendered construction of nationalism and transnationalism in media products from contemporary China and South Korea. The hypermasculinity and militarism of Wolf Man II is contrasted with the hybridity and gender-bending culture of K-pop commercialized music performances that have global reach.

Mayfair Yang is Professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology at U.C. Berkeley. She specializes in the Anthropology of Religion, modernity and the state, China Studies, Gender and Media Studies. She was Director of Asian Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia in 2007-2009. She is the author of Gifts, Favors, & Banquets: the Art of Social Relationships in China (Cornell University Press, 1994) (American Ethnological Society prize) and Re-Enchanting Modernity: Ritual Economy and Society in Wenzhou, China (Duke University Press, forthcoming 2020)She is also the editor of Chinese Religiosities: Afflictions of Modernity & State Formation (University of California Press, 2008), and Spaces of Their Own: Women’s Public Sphere in Tr