The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

The Thief Who Stole My Story: Self-Narration and Metafiction in Sinophone Literature from Thailand

Speaker: Rebecca Ehrenwirth
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-27 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-27 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-4-27 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

When Sinophone-Thai authors Sima Gong and Zeng Xin were born in the 1930s in Bangkok, they were not Sinophone writers yet. They did not even learn to speak Chinese until they were children, respectively teenagers. However, nowadays they count among the most prolific and popular Sino-Thai authors despite their rather high age. So when did they become Sinophone writers in Thailand and why?

In this talk I will discuss the importance of narrative self-making and metafiction in Sinophone literature in Thailand. I will mostly focus on flash fiction and poems by the two mentioned authors to exemplify not only how Sinophone writers try to (de-)construct their identities as Sinophone, Thai and as writers in Thailand but also how they struggle with their multiple identities in every day life.

Rebecca Ehrenwirth is an Assistant Professor of Translation (Chinese-German) at the University of Applied Sciences/SDI Munich and teaches at Jilin International Studies University in Changchun. She received her Ph.D. in Sinology from Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. Her research focuses on Sinophone literature (mainly in Southeast Asia), postcolonial studies, Queer film studies, contemporary Chinese art and film, as well as creative teaching techniques. Her book on Contemporary Sinophone Literature in Thailand was published in 2018 with Harrassowitz in Germany; a journal article on Intertextuality in Sino-Thai literature has just been published in the latest issue of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. She is currently working on an article on the Shanghai Queer Film Festival and co-editing a book on Contemporary German-Chinese Cultures in Dialogue which will be published in 2023 with Springer.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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Keynote Address | Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-17 | 9:00-10:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-16 | 21:00-22:30 (New York)
2021-4-17 | 5:00-6:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

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3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

3rd CGA/GPS Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World”

Venue: Room 1502-04, 1555 Century Avenue, NYU Shanghai & Zoom
Date : April 16-17, 2021

– Overview

The Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World” brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYUSH to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. The Symposium is designed so that early career scholars can explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work. 

– Keynote Address

Title: Between Shanghai and Rotterdam: The Global Logistics Challenge to Indian Ocean Port-Cities

Speaker: Engseng Ho | Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History, Duke University. Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Date & Time: Saturday, April 17, 2021  | 9:00-10:30 AM Shanghai

Venue: Room 1502-04, NYU Shanghai & Zoom Webinar 

Abstract

In this keynote, Professor Engseng Ho explains how port-cities come to dominate rivals in the Indian Ocean, and become icons of globalization. Located between China and Europe, these cities have jockeyed with one another for half a millennium to capture the traffic of world trade. Singapore and Dubai have become such successes in recent decades, positioning themselves as hubs in air-sea multimodal logistics and new global supply-chain networks. Others such as Jedda, Aden, Mocha, Djibouti; Surat, Calicut, Bombay; Malacca, Aceh, Riau, were dominant in previous centuries as maritime ports, and some are repositioning themselves as contenders today and into the future. They keep on their toes: none of them take success or failure for granted. What are the dynamic currents that shape and reshape such places in the Indian Ocean – their constants over the long term, and their recent shifts?

Speaker Info

Engseng Ho is the Muhammad Alagil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Arabia Asia Studies at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. At Duke University in the USA, he is Professor of Anthropology and Professor of History. He is a leading scholar of transnational anthropology, history and Muslim societies, Arab diasporas, and the Indian Ocean. His research expertise is in Arabia, coastal South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia, and he maintains active collaborations with scholars in these regions. He is co-editor of the Asian Connections book series at Cambridge University Press, and serves on the editorial boards of journals such as American Anthropologist, Comparative Studies in Society and History, History and Anthropology. He has previously held positions as Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Senior Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Director, Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore; International Economist, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation/Monetary Authority of Singapore; Country and Profile Writer, the Economist Group. He was educated at the Penang Free School, Stanford University, and the University of Chicago.

*NYU Community Only Event

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• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Paul Robeson, Joris Ivens, and Modern China

Speaker: Liang Luo
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-13 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-13 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-4-13 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Paul Robeson was a renowned American concert artist and stage and film actor who sang what became the Chinese national anthem, “March of the Volunteers,” in Mandarin Chinese in New York City and Prague, among other locations, from the late 1930s onward. Joris Ivens was a Dutch documentary filmmaker who traveled to China in 1938 to film The 400 Million (1939), a documentary that depicted the Chinese resistance against Japanese invasion and publicized “March of the Volunteers” as one of its key soundtracks. This talk connects Paul Robeson and Joris Ivens through their activist roles in the making of the Chinese national anthem, in the context of their generation of the international avant-garde, and in relation to their complex and evolving relationship with modern Chinese cultural politics, from the late 1930s to the late 1950s.

Born in Chongqing, China, Professor Liang Luo received her B.A. in Chinese and M.A. in Comparative Literature from Beijing Normal University, and her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University. She is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Kentucky and the author of The Avant-Garde and the Popular in Modern China (Michigan, 2014) and The Global White Snake (Michigan, 2021). Her current book and documentary film project is titled Profound Propaganda: The International Avant-garde and Modern China.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Identity, Security, and China: National Humiliation Discourse in the 2020s

Speaker: William A. Callahan
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-4-8 | 11:15-12:30 (Shanghai)
2021-4-7 | 22:15-00:30 (New York)
2021-4-8 | 7:15-8:30 (Abu Dhabi)

China: The Pessoptimist Nation considers how we need to look beyond the PRC’s growing economic and military power to consider how history, culture, and identity frame China’s domestic politics and international affairs. While mainstream international relations scholars talk of a security dilemma – where one state’s military strength provokes other states’ military development in a vicious cycle – the presentation suggests that Chinese politics is shaped by an “identity dilemma”: an interplay of positive and negative feelings that shape China’s pessoptimist view of itself and the world. Rather than answering the standard social science question “what is China?” with statistics of economic and military power, the presentation asks “when, where and who is China?” to explore how China’s national security is closely linked to its nationalist insecurities. While it is common to look to history to answer political questions (e.g. the “history war” between China and Japan), this presentation argues that we need to look to politics to understand history: i.e. as textbooks and popular histories from Taiwan show, the “Century of National Humiliation” is not the only way to talk about China’s modern history and politics. The presentation considers how Xi Jinping’s discussions of the China Dream and National Rejuvenation emerge from national humiliation discourse, and what this means for China (and the world) in the 2020s.  

William A. Callahan is professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and in 2020-21 he is Taiwan Foundation for Democracy Fellow at National Taiwan University. His research examines the interplay of culture and politics, and visual global politics. Callahan’s most recent book is Sensible Politics: Visualizing International Relations (Oxford University Press, 2020). His other work includes China: The Pessoptimist Nation (OUP, 2010) and the documentary film “Great Walls” (2020), which asks why we hate Trump’s wall and love the Great Wall of China (https://sensiblepolitics.net/great-walls-journeys-from-ideology-to-experience). 

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going? A Historian’s Perspective

Indian Ocean Studies: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going?
A Historian’s Perspective

Speaker: Edward A. Alpers
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-26 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-26 | 9:00-10:30 (New York)
2021-3-26 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2021-3-26 | 14:00-15:30 (Berlin)

Co-organizer: Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

This talk offers a survey of Indian Ocean Studies, focusing primarily on the development of its historiography after World War II and its emergence as a distinct scholarly enterprise from the 1980s to the present day. In particular, it examines some of the seminal monographs that have been published over the past two decades, suggesting the characteristics and challenges of modern historiography as reflected in these works. The talk concludes by raising a number of lingering questions and suggesting ways ahead for future scholarship.

Edward A. Alpers is Research Professor (Emeritus) in the UCLA Department of History. He studied African History at Harvard College and received his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Before joining UCLA in 1968 he taught for two years at the University of Dar es Salaam; in 1980 he taught at the Somali National University as a Fulbright Senior Scholar. In 1994 he served as President of the African Studies Association (USA) (1994). His research and writing focus on international trade in Indian Ocean Africa. His major publications include Ivory and Slaves in East Central Africa (1975), East Africa and the Indian Ocean (2009), and The Indian Ocean in World History (2014); he has also co-edited Cross-Currents and Community Networks: The History of the Indian Ocean World (2007), Connectivity in Motion: Island Hubs in the Indian Ocean World (2018), and Transregional Trade and Traders: Situating Gujarat in the Indian Ocean from early times to c.1900 (2019).

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Burkhard Schnepel, Professor of Social Anthropology Acting Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Area Studies Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg.

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• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Hong Kong Women in Diaspora

Speaker: Gina Marchetti
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-3-16 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2021-3-16 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2021-3-16 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Throughout its history, Hong Kong has been a transit hub serving as a point of arrival and departure for people as well as goods from around the world. These global flows hold a particular significance for women as they face unique challenges related to intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality within the Chinese diaspora. Hong Kong’s women filmmakers tell a range of stories about migration focusing on female protagonists as they navigate the various transnational networks that connect Mainland China, Hong Kong, and the rest of the world. This presentation focuses on films made by Hong Kong’s New Wave women directors, including Ann Hui, Mabel Cheung, and Clara Law, as they portray female characters located in and moving through Hong Kong from the 1980s into the twenty-first century. These prominent women directors chart the impact of Hong Kong’s change in status from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People’s Republic of China on women by drawing on various genres including the youth drama, family melodrama, and the romantic comedy.

The presentation concludes with a look at more recent developments related to women and Hong Kong history by examining Bo Wang and (Iris) Pan Lu’s Many Undulating Things (2019) in relation to COVID-19. This essay film devotes a substantial section to Hong Kong’s history of disease with specific references to the territory’s women by citing the Hollywood film Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing (Henry King, 1955). Returning to Hong Kong’s colonial past via this cinematic relationship between disease and desire, women filmmakers’ perspectives on Hong Kong, diaspora, and gender take on new meaning in our pandemic present.

Gina Marchetti teaches courses in film, gender and sexuality, critical theory and cultural studies. Her books include “Yellow Peril”: Race, Sex and Discursive Strategies in Hollywood Fiction (Berkeley: University of California, 1993), From Tian’anmen to Times Square: Transnational China and the Chinese Diaspora on Global Screens (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006), Andrew Lau and Alan Mak’s INFERNAL AFFAIRS—The Trilogy (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2007), The Chinese Diaspora on American Screens: Race, Sex, and Cinema (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012), and Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema (Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi, 2018)

She has co-edited several anthologies, including Hong Kong Film, Hollywood and the New Global Cinema, with Tan See-Kam (London: Routledge, 2007); Chinese Connections: Critical Perspectives on Film, Identity and Diaspora, with Peter X Feng and Tan See-Kam (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009); Hong Kong Screenscapes: From the New Wave to the Digital Frontier, with Esther M. K. Cheung and Tan See-Kam (HKUP, 2011); and The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema, with See Kam Tan and Aaron Magnan-Park (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

Her current research interests include women filmmakers in the HKSAR, China and world cinema, and contemporary trends in Asian and Asian American film culture.

Suggested readings:

Marchetti, Gina. “Clara Law, Asia, and World Cinema,” in Aaron Han Joon Magnan-Park, Gina Marchetti, and Tan See-Kam, eds. The Palgrave Handbook of Asian Cinema (Palgrave-Macmillan Publishers, 2018), pp.689-707.

Marchetti, Gina. “Handover Women: Hong Kong Women Filmmakers and the Intergenerational Melodrama of Infidelity,” Feminist Media Studies 16:4 (June 2016), pp. 590-609. DOI:10.1080/14680777.2016.1193292. Special Issue: “Intergenerational Feminist Media Studies: Conflicts and Connectivities”

Marchetti, Gina. “Feminism, Postfeminism, and Hong Kong Women Filmmakers,” in Esther M.K. Cheung, Gina Marchetti, and Esther C.M. Yau, eds. A Companion to Hong Kong Cinema (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2015), pp. 237-264.

Marchetti, Gina. “The Gender of GenerAsian X in Clara Law’s Migration Trilogy,” Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls: Gender in Film at the End of the Twentieth Century, ed. Murray Pomerance (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), pp. 71-87.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Weixian Pan, Assistant Professor of Interactive Media Arts, Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU.

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• Taxi card 
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• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Revolutionary Bodies: The Transnational History of Modern Chinese Dance

Speaker: Emily Wilcox
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2021-2-23 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2021-2-23 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2021-2-23 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this talk Professor Emily Wilcox will discuss transnational connections in modern Chinese dance history based on her recent book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy. As the first English-language history of dance in the People’s Republic of China, Revolutionary Bodies examines previously unexamined dance films, a wide range of Chinese-language published and archival materials, and ethnographic field research to analyze the work of major Chinese choreographers from 1935 to 2015. With a focus on transnational connections in this history, Wilcox challenges the previously held view that Soviet ballet was the primary force shaping China’s socialist dance creation, instead showing the impact of a broader range of intercultural connections, from Trinidad and London to North Korea and Uzbekistan. Wilcox also shows the important role that ethnic minority and diaspora artists played in twentieth-century Chinese dance history and demonstrates continuities and changes from the early socialist period to new choreography that has emerged in the past two decades. A central argument of the book is that transnational socialist dance experiments laid the basis for the art form today known around the world as “Chinese Dance.”

Emily Wilcox is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at William & Mary and an Affiliate of the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan. Wilcox is a leading scholar of Chinese dance and performance, with broader interests in twentieth-century global history, transnationalism, and social movements. Wilcox’s first book, Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy (University of California Press in 2018) won the 2019 de la Torre Bueno Prize© from the Dance Studies Association. Wilcox is the co-editor with Katherine Mezur of Corporeal Politics: Dancing East Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2020) and co-creator with Liangyu Fu of the Pioneers of Chinese Dance digital photograph archive, published in 2016 by the University of Michigan Asia Library. Wilcox has published more than twenty journal articles and book chapters, in English and Chinese, in leading venues in Asian studies and dance and performance studies. Wilcox taught at the University of Michigan from 2013 to 2020, where she served most recently as Associate Professor, Associate Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.

Introduction and moderation by Siye Tao, Assistant Arts Professor of Dance, NYU Shanghai.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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Islam in Asia after the Mongols: Historiography and Law

Islam in Asia after the Mongols: Historiography and Law

Speaker: Guy Burak
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-12-10 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2020-12-10 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2020-12-10 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

The talk will examine the historiographical framework of the “post-Mongol period” in the broader context of the study of the Islamic tradition in west Asia. In particular, I will reflect on the dialectics between two historiographical (and political) trends: one emphasizes the rupture caused by the Mongol invasions of the thirteenth century, while the other stresses continuity between the pre- and the post-Mongol periods. As I will show, much of the debate is about how to evaluate and define change within the Islamic tradition. I will illustrate the dynamics between the historiographical approaches by concentrating on Islamic law and political thought. 

Guy Burak is the Librarian for Middle Eastern, Islamic and Jewish Studies at NYU’s Elmer Holmes Library. He is the author of The Second Formation of Islamic Law: The Hanafi School in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2015). He has published articles on the legal, intellectual and visual histories of the post-Mongol period. He is currently working on a monograph on the history of dynastic law (qanun/kanun).

Introduction by Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Professor of History and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at New York University.

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• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

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© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Sex Work, Media Networks, and Transpacific Histories of Affect

Sex Work, Media Networks, and Transpacific Histories of Affect

Speaker: Lily Wong
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-12-8 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2020-12-8 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2020-12-8 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

The figure of the sex worker—who provokes both disdain and desire—has become a trope for both Asian American sexuality and Asian modernity. Lingering in the cultural imagination, sex workers link sexual and cultural marginality, and their tales clarify the boundaries of citizenship, nationalism, and internationalism. Based on her book, Transpacific Attachments, Lily Wong will discuss the mobility and mobilization of the sex worker figure through transpacific media networks, stressing the intersectional politics of racial, sexual, and class structures. While imaginations of a global community have long been mobilized through romantic, erotic, and gendered representations, Wong emphasizes the significant role sex work plays in the constant restructuring of social relations and transpacific alliances.

Lily Wong is an Associate Professor in the departments of Literature (LIT) and Critical Race Gender and Culture Studies (CRGC) at American University. Her research focuses on the politics of affect/emotion, gender/sexuality, racial capitalism, minor-transnational solidarity movements, as well as media formations of transpacific Chinese, Sinophone, and Asian American communities. Her work can be found in journals including American Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Asian Cinema, Asian American Literary Review, Pacific Affairs, and China Review International, among others. She has published book chapters in World Cinema and the Visual Arts (2012), Queer Sinophone Cultures (2013), Divided Lenses: War and Film Memory in Asia (2016), and Keywords in Queer Sinophone Studies (2020). She is the author of the book Transpacific Attachments: Sex Work, Media Networks, and Affective Histories of Chineseness (Columbia University Press, 2018).

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Weixian Pan, Assistant Professor of Interactive Media Arts, Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

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Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

The Mongols’ Imperial Space: From Universalism to Glocalization

The Mongols’ Imperial Space: From Universalism to Glocalization

Speaker: Michal Biran
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-12-3 | 18:00-19:30 (Shanghai)
2020-12-3 | 5:00-6:30 (New York)
2020-12-3 | 14:00-15:30 (Abu Dhabi)

This paper seeks to explain how the Mongol imperial space was created, organized, and conceived by the Mongols and their subjects in the various realms. I stress the interplay between the Mongols’ universal vision during the heydays of Chinggis Khan and his immediate heirs, the construction of a “Chinggisid space,” and the revival of “glocal” (that is, local with global characteristic) spatial concepts in Mongol-ruled China and Iran. I conclude in assessing the impact of the Mongol Empire on the shaping of the post-Mongol imperial space.

Michal Biran (PhD HUJI 2000) is a historian of pre-modern Inner Asia, China and the Muslim world and a member of the Israeli Academy of Science and Humanities. She is the Max and Sophie Mydans Foundation Professor in the Humanities at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she led the ERC-funded project “Mobility, Empire and Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia,” and teaches at the Dept. of Asian Studies and the Dept. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. She has published extensively on Mongol and Pre-Mongol Central Asia (10th-14th centuries), including Qara Khitai, the Qarakhanids and the Chaghadaids; the Mongol Empire; cross-cultural contacts between China, nomads, and the Islamic world; nomadic empires; conversion; and Ilkhanid Baghdad. She has authored three monographs and more than 70 articles, and has edited or co-edited eight volumes, the last out is Along the Silk Roads in Mongol Eurasia: Generals, Merchants, Intellectuals (with Jonathan Brack and Francesca Fiaschetti, University of California Press 2020) and another The Limits of Universal Rule: Eurasian Empires Compared (with Yuri Pines and Jörg Rupke. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) is due to appear in January 2021. She is currently working on two book projects and, together with Hodong Kim, is editing The Cambridge History of the Mongol Empire.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Sinophone Queer Homecoming as Tactics of Interventions

Sinophone Queer Homecoming as Tactics of Interventions

Speaker: E. K. Tan
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-11-17 | 17:00-18:30 (Shanghai)
2020-11-17 | 4:00-5:30 (New York)
2020-11-17 | 13:00-14:30 (Abu Dhabi)

In this presentation, I discuss the concept of “queer homecoming” as tactics of interventions that enables the articulation of alternative kinship structures in mainstream cultural expressions such as literature and new media to destabilize the myth of consanguinity among communities in Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan. By rethinking the implications of concepts such as the familiar and the familial, I examine how queer identities and queerness can unsettle the dominant discourse of heteronormative kinship and its marginalization of minority groups such as the LGBTQ communities in non-rights-based societies. I will focus on two examples, a campaign video for an LGBTQ rally in Singapore and the diary novel, A Wife’s Diary by Taiwanese lesbian writer Chen Xue, to exemplify how queer subjects navigate and negotiate a liveable space within the institution of family and the nation state. My attempt is to map out a regional topography of inter-Asian queer relationalities that reflect a set of spatial politics which seeks to reconfigure the heteronormative home and national space.

E. K. Tan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of English, and Asian and Asian American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative and World Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World. His essays have also appeared in publications such as Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies. Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities, Journal of Modern Chinese Literature, and Journal of Chinese Cinemas. He is currently working on two separate book projects tentatively titled Queer Homecoming in Sinophone Cultures and Mandarinization and Its Impact on Sinophone Cultural Production.

Introduction by Celina Hung, Assistant Professor of Literature, Interim Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

Discussant: Joyce Tan, Diversity Initiatives Specialist, Student Life, NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Religious Tolerance and Inter-Religious Encounters in the Mongol Empire

Religious Tolerance and Inter-Religious Encounters in the Mongol Empire

Speaker: Jonathan Brack
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-11-12 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2020-11-12 | 6:00-7:30 (New York)
2020-11-12 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)

Research on the Mongols’ attitudes toward the religions of the conquered people presents conflicting views. On the one hand, scholars argue that as Steppe people, the Mongols were either pragmatists or indifferent when it came to the religious practices and beliefs of their subjects, thus explaining the religious freedom they granted them and even their exemption of their subjects’ religious clergy from taxation. On the other hand, the Mongols are presented as inquisitive and curious, even high-minded, observers of the beliefs of their subjects, promoting, hosting and directly engaging in heated inter-religious debates at their courts that entailed Christians, Muslims, Buddhists and Daoists.     

This presentation is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will offer a new approach to the question of the Mongols’ pluralistic attitude. We will argue that to explain the Mongols’ religious policies, we must view them as complementary to the Mongols’ own domestic mode of “empirical religiosity.” In the second part, we will turn our attention to one chief example of court-sponsored inter-religious interactions: the encounters between Buddhists and Muslims at the Ilkhanid court in Iran. We will use this example to explore the religiously competitive and dynamic arena of the court, where religious interlocutors clashed over attempts to gain the allegiance, or even conversion, of the khans. We will further ask how these encounters shaped the knowledge and perspectives of “local” religious interlocutors on their new religious competition.  

Jonathan (Yoni) Brack is Assistant Professor in the Department of Middle East Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. He received his PhD in 2016 from the University of Michigan, and was a postdoctoral fellow in The Martin Buber Society of Fellows at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2017-2020). He studies medieval and early modern Iran and the Mongol Empire. His research examines Muslim-Buddhist exchanges and polemics in Ilkhanid Iran, sacral kingship, and Mongol conversion to Islam. His recent and forthcoming publications include “A Mongol Mahdi in Medieval Anatolia: Reform, Rebellion, and Divine Right in the Post-Mongol Islamic World” (Journal of the American Oriental Society, 2019), and “Disenchanting Heaven: Interfaith Debate, Sacral Kingship, and Conversion to Islam in the Mongol Empire, 1260-1335 (Past & Present, forthcoming 2021). He recently co-edited, together with Michal Biran and Francesca Fiaschetti, a volume title Along the Mongol Silk Roads: Merchants, Generals, Intellectuals (University of California Press, 2020).

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved

Environmental Aspects of the Mongol Conquest

Environmental Aspects of the Mongol Conquest

Speaker: Nicola Di Cosmo
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2020-11-5 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2020-11-5 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2020-11-5 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

This lecture will address the early stages of the Mongol conquest (c. 1206-1260) from an environmental perspective.  It will focus in particular on the characteristics of the Mongol army and its requirements in relation to the lands that they invaded.  The relationship between Mongols, climate, and environment will be illustrated through several case studies.

Nicola Di Cosmo 狄宇宙  is the Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study.  He holds a PhD from Indiana University, and has previously taught at Harvard University and at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand). His research interests are in the history of Chinese and Inner Asian frontiers from the ancient to the modern periods, history of nomadic peoples, Manchu and Mongol history, and climate history.  His publications include Ancient China and Its Enemies, Manchu-Mongol Relations on the Eve of the Qing Conquest, and The Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth Century China. He has edited several volumes, the last of which is Empires and Exchange in Eurasian Late Antiquity (2018).

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595032

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2021 All Rights Reserved