ATTCAT 2022

The International Workshop & Symposium on Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-6-10 to 2022-6-12
2022-6-17 to 2022-6-19

Chinese architecture is a critical component of global architectural heritage. Scholars of historic architecture around the world have been particularly fascinated by China’s traditional timber-frame system. However, the idiosyncratic technical terminology used to describe this system of building has long been an obstacle for scholars. Native and non-native speakers alike find it challenging to fully understand the terms and translate them into modern parlance and across cultural divides. Without a full understanding of the vocabulary used to describe Chinese architectural elements, this rich tradition remains largely inaccessible to an ever-expanding public interested in visiting, and more deeply understanding China’s cultural heritage sites.

In the light of this, a group of scholars and architectural historians, led by Professor CHEN Wei (Southeast University, China), Professor Tracy Miller (Vanderbilt University, USA), and Professor ZHUGE Jing (Southeast University, China), initiated an international collaboration called the Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology (ATTCAT). The ATTCAT project is a workshop that meets annually and brings scholars from different countries and cultures together to study the meaning of technical terms in traditional Chinese architecture and develop full annotated translations with bibliographic references. By then publishing revised annotations in open-access databases, the ATTCAT project seeks to advance a common knowledge of Chinese architectural terminology and the heritage it describes.

NYU Shanghai has been hosting the online workshop for the ATTCAT project since 2020. We are happy to announce that the 2022 workshop will be hosted again by NYU Shanghai and organized by Professor Lala Zuo (NYU Shanghai). The event will take place over Zoom across two weekends: June 10-12; and then again from June 17-19.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

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Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

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Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Rolling with the Rotis: Body Techniques around the Bay of Bengal

Rolling with the Rotis: Body Techniques around the Bay of Bengal

Speaker: Krishnendu Ray
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-5-27 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2022-5-27 | 9:00-10:30 (New York)
2022-5-27 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)

“Every habit makes our hand more witty, and our wit more handy” Nietzsche

Taking mundane instances of making various kinds of rotis at home and in the marketplaces, and paan chewing around the Bay of Bengal littoral, I build on recent theorizations about doing and thinking. As a sociologist among historians, I tend to look backward from the current material evidence to its historical sedimentation across different temporalities. I distinguish between things and actions that have long lineages and ones with shorter pedigrees. Practices such as cooking and eating precede individuals, who are thrown into a world with standards of mutually intelligible and acceptable behavior. Drawing on recent theorization in Anthropology and Sociology, I develop an argument about the unconscious relationship between normed practice and performative instance. In this new behavioral bent, culture is less about values in the head, and more about repetitive practices of the body and the mind. Cooking is a micropractice with larger implications, about connectivities and differences, continuities and change.

Krishnendu Ray is a Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University. He was the Chair of the department from 2012-2021. He is the author of The Migrant’s Table (2004) and The Ethnic Restaurateur (2016) and the co-editor of Curried Cultures: Globalization, Food and South Asia (2012). He was formerly a faculty member and the Acting Associate Dean of Liberal Arts at The Culinary Institute of America (1996-2005) and the President of The Association for the Study of Food and Society from 2014-2018. He is an Editorial Collective Member of the Food Studies journal Gastronomica.

Introduction by Kathleen Burke, Doctoral Fellow, Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai; PhD Candidate, University of Toronto.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

4th CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium Asia and the World

4th CGA & GPS Young Scholars Symposium
“Asia and the World”

Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-4-29 to 2022-4-30

The Young Scholars Symposium on “Asia and the World” is co-sponsored by NYU Shanghai Center for Global Asia and the GPS program, which brings together doctoral and postdoctoral fellows as well as recent alumni from NYU Shanghai to share their work on Global Asia, broadly constructed. This is the fourth year of the symposium and it is designed for scholars in their early career to explore the pan-Asian and global connections in their work. The participants will focus on topics on history, art, literature, society, archaeology, anthropology and cultural studies, and examine and expand the ever-changing intellectual boundaries of academic scholarship on China, Asia and the broader world. This year, in order to mark the 10th anniversary of the establishment of NYU Shanghai, we will also have participants, young scholars as well as faculty members, from Peking University, Tsinghua University, and Renmin University of China, who will share their research on the study of Asia. The objective is to eventually make the Young Scholars Symposium an annual pan-China event and showcase NYU Shanghai’s contribution to the study of Asia.

*By invitation only

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Keynote Address | Rethinking the Everyday: Approaching Asia-Africa through Daily Life and Popular Cultures

Rethinking the Everyday:
Approaching Asia-Africa through Daily Life and Popular Cultures

Speaker: Ying Cheng
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-4-29 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2022-4-29 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2022-4-29 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)

What happens when an African audience watches Indian or Chinese films on Saturday nights? What exactly a Chinese student gets out of a seminar about youth dance culture in West Africa?

The presentation draws attention to current studies on the transnational cultural flows between Asia and Africa that have been largely ignored in dominant discourses of postcolonialism and globalisation. I try to illustrate how popular culture functions as an essential site of mutual representation and knowledge production within a Third World context. Popular culture forms exemplify ‘the episteme of the everyday’ (Newell and Okome, 2014) that speaks to ordinary people’s concerns, values, desires and desperations. The transnational circulations of pop cultural forms not only shape people’s imagination of self and other, but provoke alternative imaginaries of modernities and globalisation within a Southern context. 

The presentation calls for a southern, comparative theoretical endeavour among scholars of Asian and African studies: From which kind of shared daily experiences are the ‘African-Asian affinities’ (Jean-François and Jeychandran, 2022) generated? How could we think of Asia-Africa as an epistemological framework that challenges traditional models of academic theorisation in area studies and other disciplines? And how could we reactivate our academic debates with languages or ‘vernaculars’ rooted in the lifeworld of Asia and Africa?

Ying Cheng is an assistant professor in the Department of Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Peking University. Her research interests include youth and popular culture in Africa, African visual and performance arts, cultural interactions between China and Africa, and so on. Dr Ying Cheng is an editorial board member of the Journal of African Cultural Studies. She has also been a research associate (Arts of Africa and the Souths) of Rhodes University, South Africa since 2017. In recent years, she has published articles in African Arts, Routledge Handbook of African Literature, African Theatre, Journal of African Culture Studies and so on.

Introduction by M. Yunus RAFIQ, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at NYU Shanghai.

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To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Shi Lu’s Visit to India in 1955 and the Cosmopolitanism of National Art

Shi Lu’s Visit to India in 1955 and the Cosmopolitanism of National Art

Speaker: Juliane Noth
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-3-10 | 19:00-20:30 (Shanghai)
2022-3-10 | 6:00-7:30 (New York)
2022-3-10 | 15:00-16:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2022-3-10 | 12:00-13:30 (Berlin)

The Chinese painter Shi Lu (1919–1982), a veteran of the revolution and party secretary of the Xi’an Branch of the Chinese Artists Association, visited Delhi in July 1955 as the artistic director of the Chinese pavilion at the Indian Industries Fair. During this visit, he produced several paintings and sketches that document sites of cultural interest and people from different social backgrounds in realistic portraits. But the encounter with Indian culture and with Egypt in the following year seems to have sparked in him a renewed interest in Chinese traditional painting, an interest that would lead him away from realistic modes of painting and towards more expressive and individualistic forms. The importance of these cross-cultural encounters resurfaced in 1970, when Shi Lu revised some of the paintings he had made in India and Egypt. While suffering from schizophrenic episodes, he covered the paintings with a new layer of graphic signs and texts. In my talk I will show how Shi Lu construed in these paintings a common cultural past for China and India while at the same time delineating a contemporary world of socialist cosmopolitanism in which the artist situated himself in a moment of utmost personal crisis.

Juliane Noth is Professor of East Asian Art History at Freie Universität Berlin and Research Professor at the China Institute for Visual Studies at the China Academy of Art. The focus of her research is on Chinese art and visual culture of the twentieth century. She is the author of Landschaft und Revolution: Die Malerei von Shi Lu (2009) and co-editor of four edited volumes. Her articles were published in Art History, Ars Orientalis, Trans Asia Photography Review, Xin Meishu, and Twentieth-Century China. Her second book, Transmedial Landscapes and Modern Chinese Painting, is forthcoming with Harvard Asia Center in May 2022.

Introduction by Adhira Mangalagiri, Lecturer in Comparative Literature at Queen Mary University of London; Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

The Alchemy of Ritual Architecture in Early Buddhist Asia

The Alchemy of Ritual Architecture in Early Buddhist Asia

Speaker: Tracy Miller
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-3-4 | 21:00-22:30 (Shanghai)
2022-3-4 | 8:00-9:30 (New York)
2022-3-4 | 17:00-18:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2022-3-4 | 7:00-8:30 (Nashville)

Although miao 廟, ta 塔, and si 寺 were all used to describe early Buddhist architecture in China, one of the first ritual spaces for the Buddha was a huagai 華蓋, literally a “foliate canopy” or “flourishing cover.” Similar to the central element in “Domes of Heaven” across Buddhist Asia, the floral shape of which is believed to derive from Western divisions of the circle, the huagai in the Chinese context predates other evidence of specifically Buddhist influence. But if the “foliate canopy” was not the result of the adoption of a new spiritual tradition, why incorporate this alternative celestial geometry into the Sinitic world view?

By examining the iconographic elements of crowning structures across Asia during the early centuries BCE-CE, this paper will show how ornamental canopies were expected to provide more than decorative shelter. Rather, they were conceived as necessary to create an appropriate atmosphere for the alchemical transformation of natural substances—from mined ore to the human body. Focusing on empirical observation over sectarian ideology, I argue that technologies of containment transmitted along the silk and incense routes from West Asia to China fueled the acceptance of alternative cosmologies and resulted in stylistically different, but functionally similar, ritual architectures.

Tracy Miller is Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture and Asian Studies at Vanderbilt University. Her research specialization is medieval Chinese ritual architecture and sacred landscapes. She holds an interdisciplinary MA (1996) and PhD (2000) from the University of Pennsylvania in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (emphasis: China). She has published The Divine Nature of Power: Chinese Ritual Architecture at the Sacred Site of Jinci (Harvard Asia Center, 2007), and articles in major art history and interdisciplinary journals including The Art Bulletin, Archives of Asian Art, Tang Studies, and Artibus Asiae. She is currently completing a book manuscript on the use of generative design strategies in the creation of ritual architecture in Medieval China. Additionally, working with colleagues globally (including at NYU Shanghai), she helped launch the ATTCAT (Annotation and Translation of Traditional Chinese Architecture Terminology) Project, published through ArchitecturaSinica.org, the first publicly accessible research database of traditional Chinese architecture and architecture terminology. At Vanderbilt she teaches courses on the history of art and architecture across Asia.

Introduction by Lala Zuo, Associate Professor of Art History at NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

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CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Channels: Small Traders in the Digital Age

Channels: Small Traders in the Digital Age

Speaker: Biao Xiang
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-2-23 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2022-2-23 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2022-2-23 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2022-2-23 | 13:00-14:30 (Berlin)

Co-organizer: Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

This presentation explores how petty traders and manufacturers from the global South can join the world market without relying on hierarchical supply chains, monopolistic platform companies, or informal networks. It suggests that international trade based on “channels” among petty traders can empower small players. Channel is in-person connection (though often supplemented by online communication) that people establish purposefully to exchange selected information for a particular goal. Neither random encountering nor friendship are channels. Channel is horizontal, thus different from supply chain. Channel enables traders and manufacturers to communicate constantly and therefore to change the product, the price, the methods of payment and goods delivery, thus different from digital platforms that offer many choices among ready-made goods and set prices but few chances for making changes or developing collaboration. Channel is “deal-specific” in the sense that traders constantly make new channels, thus it is different from personal networks. All transactions need channels of some sort, the question is under what conditions can small traders make effective global channels at a low cost, thus can free themselves from large corporations. This presentation addresses this question by drawing on traders’ experiences in Yiwu, a town in southeast China known as the world’s largest wholesale center for manufactured commodities for daily consumption.

Biao Xiang 项飙 is Director of Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Germany since 2020, and Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford before that. Xiang’s research addresses various types of migration – internal and international, unskilled and highly skilled, emigration and return migration, and the places and people left behind – in China, India and other parts of Asia. Xiang is the winner of the 2008 Anthony Leeds Prize for his book Global Bodyshopping and the 2012 William L. Holland Prize for his article ‘Predatory Princes’. His 2000 Chinese book 跨越边界的社区 (published in English as Transcending Boundaries, 2005) was reprinted in 2018 as a contemporary classic, and 自己作为方法 (Self as Method, co-authored with Wu Qi) was ranked the Most Impactful Book 2020. His work has been translated into Japanese, French, Korean, Spanish, German and Italian.

Opening Remarks by Burkhard Schnepel, Professor of Social Anthropology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg.

Introduction by Tansen Sen, Professor of History Director of the Center for Global Asia, NYU Shanghai.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved

Where is Home? A Conversation with Wang Gungwu

Where is Home? A Conversation with Wang Gungwu

Speaker: Wang Gungwu, Tansen Sen, and Tzu-hui Celina Hung
Venue: Hosted via Zoom
Date & Time:
2022-1-28 | 20:00-21:30 (Shanghai)
2022-1-28 | 7:00-8:30 (New York)
2022-1-28 | 16:00-17:30 (Abu Dhabi)
2022-1-28 | 20:00-21:30 (Singapore)

Wang Gungwu is a renowned scholar of Chinese history, Southeast Asia and the Chinese overseas, a leading theorist of Chinese identity, and a prominent commentator on the contemporary Chinese state. He has also been a celebrated builder of institutions in Malaysia, Australia, Hong Kong, and Singapore. Born in Surabaya, Indonesia, Wang Gungwu did his schooling in Ipoh, Malaysia. He earned his bachelor and master degrees from the University of Malaya, and PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Wang Gungwu’s recent books Home is Not Here and Home is Where We Are recount his journey through transregional spaces and his participation in nation building, while reflecting the predicaments he had with his identity and belonging. This conversation with Wang Gungwu revisits some of the fascinating episodes described in these two books. It will also engage with him on the notable contributions he has made to the study of China, the Chinese overseas, and transregional history.

 

Professor Wang Gungwu is the former Chairman of the East Asian Institute and University Professor, National University of Singapore. He is also Emeritus Professor of the Australian National University. Professor Wang received his B.A. (Hons) and M.A. degrees from the University of Malaya in Singapore, and his Ph.D. at the University of London (1957). His teaching career took him from the University of Malaya (Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, 1957-1968, Professor of History 1963-68) to The Australian National University (1968-1986), where he was Professor and Head of the Department of Far Eastern History and Director of the Research of Pacific Studies. From 1986 to 1995, he was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong. He was Director of East Asian Institute of NUS from 1997 to 2007.

Professor Wang is a Commander of the British Empire (CBE); Fellow, and former President, of the Australian Academy of the Humanities; Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Science; Member of Academia Sinica; Honorary Member of the Chinese Academy of Social Science. He was conferred the International Academic Prize, Fukuoka Asian Cultural Prizes, and the 2020 Tang Prize in Sinology.

His books include The Nanhai Trade: The Early History of Chinese Trade in the South China Sea. New Edition (1998), The Chinese Overseas: From Earthbound China to the Quest for Autonomy (2000), Anglo-Chinese Encounters since 1800: War, Trade, Science and Governance (2003), Renewal: The Chinese State and the New Global History (2013), Another China Cycle: Committing to Reform (2014), Home is Not Here (2018), and Home is Where We Are (2020).

 

Tansen Sen is Professor of history; the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai; and Global Network Professor at NYU. He is the author of Buddhism, Diplomacy, and Trade: The Realignment of Sino-Indian Relations, 600-1400 (2003; 2016) and India, China, and the World: A Connected History (2017). He has co-authored (with Victor H. Mair) Traditional China in Asian and World History (2012), edited Buddhism Across Asia: Networks of Material, Cultural and Intellectual Exchange (2014), and co-edited (with Burkhard Schnepel) Travelling Pasts: The Politics of Cultural Heritage in the Indian Ocean World (2019) and (with Brian Tsui) Beyond Pan-Asianism: Connecting China and India, 1840s–1960s (2021). He is currently working on a book about Zheng He’s maritime expeditions in the early fifteenth century, a monograph on Jawaharlal Nehru and China, and co-editing (with Engseng Ho) the Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, volume 1.

 

Celina Hung received her PhD in comparative literature from the Department of Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her research centers on Sinophone literature and culture, Chinese migration and its cultural networks, Anglophone literature, and discourses of creolization and multiculturalism in Asia. She is writing a book project titled Creolizing the Sinophone Pacific, which examines the multilingual articulations of creolization by writers and filmmakers from Southeast Asia with such backgrounds as Babas, Chinoys, and Peranakans, amid a changing nexus of political and cultural forces. She also works on Taiwan’s cultural representations of new-immigrant communities. Some of her articles and chapters on these issues include “‘There Are No Chinamen in Singapore’: Creolization and Self-Fashioning of the Straits Chinese in the Colonial Contact Zone” (in Journal of Chinese Overseas), “Sinophone Studies through the Lens of Creolization” (in Sun Yat-sen Journal of Humanities), “Documenting ‘Immigrant Brides’ in Multicultural Taiwan” (in Asian Video Cultures), “Translator” (in Keywords of Taiwan Theory), “The Promise and Peril of Translation in the Taiwan Literature Awards for Migrants” (forthcoming in the volume Sinoglossia), and “Fishers, Captives, and Storytellers in Taiwan’s Transnational Fishing Industry” (forthcoming in the volume Feeling Transpacific Current(s)).

 

Introduction by Joanna Waley-Cohen, Provost for New York University Shanghai and Silver Professor of History at New York University.

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Location & Details

To our visitors:
• RSVP may be required for this event. Please check event details
• Visitors will need to present a photo ID at the entrance
• There is no public parking on campus
• Entrance only through the South Lobby (1555 Century Avenue) 
• Taxi card 
• Metro: Century Avenue Station, Metro Lines 2/4/6/9 Exit 6 in location B 
• Bus: Century Avenue at Pudian Road, Bus Lines 169/987

#Center for Global Asia

WeChat

CONTACT US

Email: shanghai.cga@nyu.edu

Phone Number: +86 (21) 20595043

WeChat: NYUShanghaiCGA

Address: 1555 Century Avenue,

Pudong New District, Shanghai, China

© 2022 All Rights Reserved